Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Hurricanes rattle threatened plant species

Date:
December 7, 1999
Source:
University Of Guelph
Summary:
Attempts to save a little-known domestic food plant species, which may provide valuable health benefits, have been threatened by recent hurricanes, says a University of Guelph researcher.

Attempts to save a little-known domestic food plant species, which may provide valuable health benefits, have been threatened by recent hurricanes, says a University of Guelph researcher.

Related Articles


Adjunct professor Massimo Marcone, Department of Food Science, is studying the seed components of Amaranthus pumilus, popularly called seabeach amaranth. It's an ancient plant, whose closest relative, Amaranthus hypochondriacus, has been used lately by health-food advocates who extol its nutritional and functional properties. Seabeach amaranth was hit particularly hard by recent hurricanes on the Atlantic coast, making Marcone's work more crucial and pressing.

Marcone is trying to scientifically confirm the functional properties of the plant to maintain stocks of the species. This particular species of amaranth was listed as a globally threatened plant species in 1993. Its habitat is being destroyed not only by natural disasters, but also by cottage sea walls and beach erosion. Most people consider it a weed.

"There were an estimated maximum of only 3,000 individual Amaranth pumilus plants left growing in the wild," says Marcone. "However, the bad news is that virtually all known wild plant species have been destroyed by recent hurricanes. We don't have to go to Brazilian rainforests to see a decrease in biodiversity, it's happening on our own continent." Production and consumption of the amaranth grain peaked during the Mayan and Aztec periods of Central America, when it was used as a food crop and ceremonial plant. Its decline began when Spanish conquerors legislated a ban forbidding its production and use — under the punishment of death — to destroy the Aztec religion.

Amaranth has regained popularity, primarily in the health food industry. It has a large protein, dietary fibre and mineral content compared with traditional grains.

The seabeach amaranth Marcone is studying is native to beaches of the Atlantic coast. It's particularly interesting because of its salt tolerance, decreased water requirement and ability to ease soil erosion make it environmentally hardy. In its wild form, seabeach amaranth may also contain high levels of squalene, an oil lubricant used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Squalene is currently derived from sharks and whales, but a plant source may decrease this marine dependency. In the U.S., seabeach amaranth is so threatened that the distribution of its seed, even for scientific purposes, is tightly controlled. Marcone managed to get a small number of seeds from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to determine exact levels of their components, such as proteins, fats and carbohydrates. Each of these components has the potential for additional uses, increasing the seeds' value beyond a cereal grain alternative and perhaps making it a functional food.

"We don't know if there's anything else of value in Amaranth pumilus because it's never been explored," says Marcone. "We know it's been used for many years but we need screening to validate its benefits, and this must be done before it becomes extinct."

Marcone hopes his research will encourage the conservation of seabeach amaranth. He's now growing his own seeds to produce a sustainable population that can then be more extensively studied. If beneficial properties are discovered, a cultivated form will be developed and long-term storage of the seed can be provided. The preliminary data looks very promising for maintaining stocks of the plant.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Guelph. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Guelph. "Hurricanes rattle threatened plant species." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 December 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/12/991206145543.htm>.
University Of Guelph. (1999, December 7). Hurricanes rattle threatened plant species. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/12/991206145543.htm
University Of Guelph. "Hurricanes rattle threatened plant species." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/12/991206145543.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Classic Hollywood Memorabilia Goes Under the Hammer

Classic Hollywood Memorabilia Goes Under the Hammer

Reuters - Entertainment Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) The iconic piano from "Casablanca" and the Cowardly Lion suit from "The Wizard of Oz" fetch millions at auction. Sara Hemrajani reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Feast Your Eyes: Lamb Chop Sent Into Space from UK

Feast Your Eyes: Lamb Chop Sent Into Space from UK

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Nov. 25, 2014) Take a stab at this -- stunt video shows a lamb chop's journey from an east London restaurant over 30 kilometers into space. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins