Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists Report First Complete DNA Sequence Of Plant Chromosomes

Date:
December 16, 1999
Source:
National Science Foundation
Summary:
Scientists involved in an international effort to sequence the entire genome of Arabidopsis thaliana have reported the first complete DNA sequence of a plant chromosome in the December 16, 1999, issue of the journal Nature. The results provide new information about chromosome structure, evolution, intracellular signaling and disease resistance in plants.

Scientists involved in an international effort to sequence the entire genome of Arabidopsis thaliana have reported the first complete DNA sequence of a plant chromosome in the December 16, 1999, issue of the journal Nature. The results provide new information about chromosome structure, evolution, intracellular signaling and disease resistance in plants. The research conducted by U.S. participants was funded in large part by the National Science Foundation (NSF), as well as the U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Energy.

Related Articles


U.S. and European scientists in the Nature article report the complete DNA sequence of two of the five chromosomes of Arabidopsis. Working together, a U.S. consortium led by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientist Richard McCombie, and the European Union Arabidopsis Genome Sequencing Consortium led by Michael Bevan of the John Innes Centre (Norwich, UK), completed the sequence of chromosome 4. A team of scientists at The Institute for Genomic Research in Rockville, Maryland, determined the sequence of chromosome 2. Together, these chromosomes comprise roughly one-third of the Arabidopsis genome. Scientists predict that sequencing of the entire genome will be completed by the end of 2000.

Says Mary Clutter, assistant director of NSF for biological sciences, "Scientists can use this information to understand the function of genes in important plant processes. These studies will ultimately lead to the development of plants that are more nutritious, produce useful chemicals,withstand flood and drought, or can grow on marginal lands. Considering how much we were able to learn about the genome organization at the chromosome level, we can look forward to many new discoveries next year when the entire genome is completed."

Arabidopsis thaliana has emerged as a powerful tool for research in plant molecular biology and genetics. The short generation time and relatively compact genome of Arabidopsis make it an ideal model system for understanding numerous features of plant biology, including ones that are of significant value to agriculture, energy, environment, and health.

"We are three or four years ahead of schedule," says McCombie, referring to the current progress toward the goal of completing the Arabidopsis genome sequencing project. "This is due largely to the fact that throughout this endeavor, all the groups involved have worked hard to share information."

Analysis of the chromosome 4 sequence and comparison of this sequence to that of chromosome 2 revealed several interesting features. The most striking is the extent to which individual genes and entire blocks of chromosomal regions have been duplicated in the Arabidopsis genome. For example, a very large stretch of DNA (4.6 million base pairs) is duplicated on chromosomes 2 and 4. This duplication represents approximately one-quarter of the total length of each of these chromosomes, and its existence in plants supports the emerging view that large-scale intragenome duplications may significantly impact genome evolution in many organisms.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Science Foundation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Science Foundation. "Scientists Report First Complete DNA Sequence Of Plant Chromosomes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 December 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/12/991216080804.htm>.
National Science Foundation. (1999, December 16). Scientists Report First Complete DNA Sequence Of Plant Chromosomes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/12/991216080804.htm
National Science Foundation. "Scientists Report First Complete DNA Sequence Of Plant Chromosomes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/12/991216080804.htm (accessed March 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Friday, March 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Jockey Motion Tracking Reveals Racing Prowess

Jockey Motion Tracking Reveals Racing Prowess

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 26, 2015) Using motion tracking technology, researchers from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) are trying to establish an optimum horse riding style to train junior jockeys, as well as enhance safety, health and well-being of both racehorses and jockeys. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Botswana Talks to End Illegal Wildlife Trade

Botswana Talks to End Illegal Wildlife Trade

AFP (Mar. 25, 2015) Experts are gathering in Botswana to try to end the illegal wildlife trade that is decimating populations of elephants, rhinos and other threatened species. Duration: 01:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Elephants Help Keep 18-Wheeler From Toppling Over

Elephants Help Keep 18-Wheeler From Toppling Over

Newsy (Mar. 25, 2015) The Natchitoches Parish Sheriff&apos;s Office discovered two elephants keeping a tractor-trailer that had gotten stuck in some mud upright on a highway. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Baby 'pet' Orangutan Rescued from Chicken Cage Takes First Steps

Baby 'pet' Orangutan Rescued from Chicken Cage Takes First Steps

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Mar. 25, 2015) Buti, a baby orangutan who was left malnourished in a chicken cage before his rescue, takes his first steps after months of painful physical therapy. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins