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Reduced Fish Stocks Linked To Increased Bushmeat Trade, Wildlife Declines In W. Africa

Date:
December 3, 2004
Source:
University Of British Columbia
Summary:
Declining fish stocks are fuelling a multibillion-dollar bushmeat trade in West Africa. It's a trend that is threatening the survival of dozens of wildlife species, and EU fishing agreements with African nations may be part of the problem, says a group of international researchers.

Declining fish stocks are fuelling a multibillion-dollar bushmeat trade in West Africa. It's a trend that is threatening the survival of dozens of wildlife species, and EU fishing agreements with African nations may be part of the problem, says a group of international researchers that includes UBC forestry sciences professor Peter Arcese, UBC zoology professor Anthony Sinclair and UBC graduate Justin Brashares (now an assistant professor at UC, Berkeley).

Using 30 years worth of census data collected monthly by rangers in six nature reserves in Ghana, the researchers have found a direct link between fish supply and the demand for bushmeat in Ghanaian villages. Bushmeat is any wild species taken from public land and sold for consumption.

“The university competes internationally to secure these investigators. Their decision to accept a UBC appointment reflects the outstanding calibre of research taking place here,” says UBC President Martha Piper. “Today’s announcement is truly a demonstration of the federal government’s commitment to put Canada among the world’s leaders of innovation.”CRC positions are designed to build Canada's research capacity. A federal investment of $900 million will support the establishment of 2,000 Chairs at universities across the country by 2005.

The group’s findings will be published in November 12 issue of the journal Science.

More than half of Ghana’s 20 million people reside within 100 km of the coast, where fish are the primary source of dietary protein and income.

Looking at data for the years 1970 to 1998, researchers found that in 14 local food markets, when fish supply was limited or its price increased, residents substituted bushmeat as an alternate source of affordable protein and the number of bushmeat hunters observed by rangers in parks increased. Overall, the wildlife harvest has contributed to a 76 per cent decline in the biomass of 41 species of mammals in parks since 1970.

The bushmeat trade in Ghana is estimated conservatively at 400,000 tons per year. Species affected include several species of antelope, carnivores and small primates.

During the same period, trawl surveys conducted in the Gulf of Guinea, off Ghana’s coast, since 1970 along with other regional stock assessments, estimate that fish biomass in nearshore and offshore waters has declined by at least 50 per cent. In the same period, there has been a threefold increase in human populations in the region.

“We've suspected this link exists but this is the first time we've been able to demonstrate it,” says Arcese, an associate professor in UBC’s forestry faculty.

"Everyone is familiar in a colloquial way with the effects on wildlife in Africa, but to demonstrate the links between human demands for protein and the decline of wildlife resources in a statistical way has not been done before because the data hasn't been available. We've been able to do this study because of the long history of ranger surveys in Ghana.”

The researchers suspect the decline in the availability of fish at local Ghanaian markets is linked to heavy overfishing in the Gulf of Guinea. UBC fisheries professor Daniel Pauly and others have identified the Gulf as one of the most overfished areas of the world, and now at risk of collapse.

Declines in fish stocks in waters off West Africa have coincided with more than ten-fold increases in regional fish harvests by foreign and domestic fleets since 1950. The European Union has consistently had the largest foreign presence off West Africa, with EU fish harvests there increasing by a factor of 20 from 1950 to 2001.

Arcese says the results support arguments that he, Sinclair and other biologists and agricultural economists have made for over a decade that urgent measures are needed to develop local sources of cheap protein alternatives to offset demand for wildlife harvest.

But, he adds, until the larger issue of international fish export agreements, increased populations and increased demand for food is addressed, local-level efforts to prevent the extinction of wildlife species will be very difficult.

“Many conservationists in Africa have been focusing on small-scale interaction of people near parks and say the solution lies in local development projects for local people,” Arcese says. “It's an ethical and good approach, but if the larger problem of wildlife decline is mainly a result of large-scale economic policies and pressures that cause the over-exploitation of natural resources, including marine fishes, then small-scale development projects that sometimes encourage the reliance of local people on wildlife harvest are unlikely to have a positive impact on the rate of wildlife decline.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of British Columbia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of British Columbia. "Reduced Fish Stocks Linked To Increased Bushmeat Trade, Wildlife Declines In W. Africa." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 December 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041129105750.htm>.
University Of British Columbia. (2004, December 3). Reduced Fish Stocks Linked To Increased Bushmeat Trade, Wildlife Declines In W. Africa. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041129105750.htm
University Of British Columbia. "Reduced Fish Stocks Linked To Increased Bushmeat Trade, Wildlife Declines In W. Africa." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041129105750.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

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