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Light Activated Anticancer Drug Targeted To DNA Using Cisplatin Like Sub-units

Date:
March 29, 2006
Source:
Virginia Tech
Summary:
One of the most effective chemotherapy drugs against cancer is cisplatin because it attaches to cancer DNA and disrupts repair. However, it also kills healthy tissue. A Virginia Tech chemistry-biology research team that has been working on both non-cisplatin drugs and cisplatin analogs has combined their findings to create a molecular complex (supramolecule) that exploits cisplatins tumor targeting to deliver a light activated drug.

One of the most effective chemotherapy drugs against cancer is cisplatin because it attaches to cancer DNA and disrupts repair. However, it also kills healthy tissue. Many scientists are creating alternative drugs or cisplatin analogs in attempts to find treatments without side effects. One approach to analog development is light activated drugs, or photodynamic therapy (PDT). Now a Virginia Tech chemistry-biology research team that has been working on both non-cisplatin drugs and cisplatin analogs has combined their findings to create a molecular complex (supramolecule) that exploits cisplatins tumor targeting to deliver a light activated drug.

The latest results from the group's research to create a DNA targeting, light activated anticancer drug were presented at the 231st American Chemical Society national meeting in Atlanta .

Chemistry professor Karen J. Brewer reports that the group has developed supramolecular complexes that combine light-absorbing PDT agents and cisplatin like units. Previous anticancer molecules created by the group have contained platinum-based molecules that bind DNA. They have also developed new light activated systems able to photocleave DNA. This report combines these two approaches to target the drug to DNA using cisplatin like units, directing the light activation to tumor cells and the sub-cellular target, DNA.

"In the past, our light activated systems had to find the DNA within the cell, an often inefficient process. Now we have added the DNA targeting drug," Brewer said. "We were working on cisplatin analogs before, so we have tied it to light activated systems."

Cisplatin begins its interaction with cancer DNA by binding to the nitrogen atoms of the DNA bases, typically guanine. Our new supramolecules use this nitrogen-binding site to hold the light activated drug at the target until signaled to activate. Thus the new supramolecules can be delivered to the tumor site but remain inert until activated by a light signal. Light waves in the therapeutic range -- that is, those that can penetrate tissue, are used to activate these new drugs. t The researchers are also appending other molecules that emit UV light to track the movement of these drugs within cells.

Virginia Tech chemistry graduate student Ran Miao will discuss how component identity dictates device properties. He presented the paper, "Synthesis and properties of mixed-metal Ru-Pt complexes: Coupling light absorbers to reactive metal centers" (INOR 105) March 26, at the Georgia World Congress Center. Co-authors are Matthew T. Mongelli, postdoctoral associate in chemistry at Virginia Tech, and Brewer.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Virginia Tech. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Virginia Tech. "Light Activated Anticancer Drug Targeted To DNA Using Cisplatin Like Sub-units." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 March 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/03/060329085658.htm>.
Virginia Tech. (2006, March 29). Light Activated Anticancer Drug Targeted To DNA Using Cisplatin Like Sub-units. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/03/060329085658.htm
Virginia Tech. "Light Activated Anticancer Drug Targeted To DNA Using Cisplatin Like Sub-units." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/03/060329085658.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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