Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Salmon Farming Threatens Chile's Patagonian Lakes

Date:
June 22, 2007
Source:
World Wildlife Fund
Summary:
The production of farmed salmon in Chile's unique Patagonian lakes has doubled in the last decade, contaminating them with nutrient pollution, invasive species, disease and harmful chemicals, according to a new study. Moving farmed salmon from freshwater lakes to land-based closed systems would reduce environmental pressures and increase Chile's competitiveness in the global salmon trade.

Cages of farmed salmon at Llanquihue Lakes in Southern Chile.
Credit: Copyright WWF/Rodrigo Sandoval

A new WWF study just released finds that the production of farmed salmon in Chile’s unique Patagonian lakes has doubled in the last decade, contaminating them with nutrient pollution, invasive species, disease and harmful chemicals.

Related Articles


The study — Salmon Farming in the Lakes of Southern Chile: History, Tendencies, and Environmental Impacts — urges the Chilean industry to move farmed salmon out of freshwater ecosystems to closed-containment recirculation systems on land.

“These lakes are a global treasure and pollution from salmon farming is completely avoidable,” said David Tecklin, WWF’s representative in Chile.

“Chile has become the world’s second largest producer of farmed salmon but the industry must rapidly improve its environmental practices if it expects to survive in the global marketplace.”

Moving farmed salmon from freshwater lakes to land-based closed systems would reduce environmental pressures and increase Chile’s competitiveness in the global salmon trade. The majority of salmon consumed in the US, for example, is farmed, and the bulk of it comes from Chile.

Lake pollution

In an effort to replicate salmon’s natural lifecycle, the salmon industry has used Chile’s freshwater lakes for the past 25 years to produce salmon smolt (large juvenile fish), which are later transported to marine sites to mature. Smolt production has become — along with urban sewage — the most significant point source of pollution for Chile’s unique and pristine freshwater lakes.

The study found that total smolt production in Chile’s freshwater systems has increased exponentially over the last several years. In 1998, 91 million smolt were produced in Chile’s freshwater ecosystems. In 2005, approximately 293 million smolt were produced.

According to WWF, in order to sustain these production levels while maintaining the ecological integrity of Chile’s freshwater systems, especially lakes, smolt production must move to land-based systems. Such systems are widely used in other salmon producing countries and have been adopted by some companies in Chile. The state-of-the-art technology is based on closed-containment recirculation systems. A complete transition from lakes to this type of facility is estimated to require an investment of approximately US$43 million, representing only 2 percent of the value of Chile’s total salmon exports in 2006.

“Closed-containment recirculation systems will minimize the negative environmental impacts of the freshwater stages of salmon production, and will also result in faster salmon growth rates, lower mortality rates, and will reduce the need for chemicals to control disease,” said Jorge Leon, a WWF consultant and co-author of the report.

“Chile has become a world leader in salmon production, providing both a challenge and a great opportunity to demonstrate environmental leadership. Transitioning smolt production out of lakes is one very important first step in this process.”

Win-win situation

The study is part of a global effort WWF has with the salmon industry, other NGOs, governments, scientists, and other stakeholders to identify key impacts of salmon farming and to develop performance-based standards.

“The implementation of these standards will result in better zoning for salmon operations, fewer salmon ‘escapes’ into waterways, a healthier environment and reduced chemical use,” said Jason Clay, Vice-President of Markets and Agriculture at WWF-US.

“Together, these measures will ensure that salmon remains a safe source of protein for human consumption.”

The salmon industry in Chile provides an estimated 45,000 jobs, and salmon has become one of the country’s major exports after copper and timber. Over the last 15 years, total salmon production has increased ten fold, reaching a total of 378,000 tons worth US$2.2 billion in 2006.

“Adopting better practices in the salmon farming industry will be a win-win situation for all,” added Tecklin.

“It’s a win for consumers looking for healthy products derived from good environmental and social practices, for salmon producers and people whose jobs depend on this sector, and for Chilean society as a whole as it restores and conserves unique freshwater and marine ecosystems.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by World Wildlife Fund. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

World Wildlife Fund. "Salmon Farming Threatens Chile's Patagonian Lakes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 June 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070621202901.htm>.
World Wildlife Fund. (2007, June 22). Salmon Farming Threatens Chile's Patagonian Lakes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070621202901.htm
World Wildlife Fund. "Salmon Farming Threatens Chile's Patagonian Lakes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070621202901.htm (accessed November 1, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Watch Baby Goose Survive A 400-Foot Cliff Dive

Watch Baby Goose Survive A 400-Foot Cliff Dive

Buzz60 (Oct. 31, 2014) For its nature series Life Story, the BBC profiled the barnacle goose, whose chicks must make a daredevil 400-foot cliff dive from their nests to find food. Jen Markham has the astonishing video. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
World's Salamanders At Risk From Flesh-Eating Fungus

World's Salamanders At Risk From Flesh-Eating Fungus

Newsy (Oct. 31, 2014) The import of salamanders around the globe is thought to be contributing to the spread of a deadly fungus. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Alcoholic Drinks In The E.U. Could Get Calorie Labels

Alcoholic Drinks In The E.U. Could Get Calorie Labels

Newsy (Oct. 31, 2014) A health group in the United Kingdom has called for mandatory calorie labels on alcoholic beverages in the European Union. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Malaria Threat in Liberia as Fight Against Ebola Rages

Malaria Threat in Liberia as Fight Against Ebola Rages

AFP (Oct. 31, 2014) Focus on treating the Ebola epidemic in Liberia means that treatment for malaria, itself a killer, is hard to come by. MSF are now undertaking the mass distribution of antimalarials in Monrovia. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins