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Bacteria In Mouth Help Make Certain Foods Tasty

Date:
November 11, 2008
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Scientists in Switzerland are reporting that bacteria in the human mouth play a role in creating the distinctive flavors of certain foods. They found that these bacteria actually produce food odors from odorless components of food, allowing people to fully savor fruits and vegetables.

Scientists report that mouth bacteria are responsible for creating the distinctive flavors of certain foods, including some fruits and vegetables.
Credit: iStockphoto/Stephanie Horrocks

Scientists in Switzerland are reporting that bacteria in the human mouth play a role in creating the distinctive flavors of certain foods. They found that these bacteria actually produce food odors from odorless components of food, allowing people to fully savor fruits and vegetables.

Their study is scheduled for the November 12 edition of the ACS bi-weekly Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

In the study, Christian Starkenmann and colleagues point out that some fruits and vegetables release characteristic odors only after being swallowed. While scientists have previously reported that volatile compounds produced from precursors found in these foods are responsible for this 'retroaromatic' effect, the details of this transformation were not understood.

To fill that knowledge gap, the scientists performed sensory tests on 30 trained panelists to evaluate the odor intensity of volatile compounds – known as thiols – that are released from odorless sulfur compounds found naturally in grapes, onions, and bell peppers.

When given samples of the odorless compounds, it took participants 20 to 30 seconds to perceive the aroma of the thiols – and this perception persisted for three minutes. The researchers also determined that the odorless compounds are transformed into the thiols by anaerobic bacteria residing in the mouth – causing the characteristic 'retroaromatic' effect.

"The mouth acts as a reactor, adding another dimension to odor perceptions," they explain. However, the authors conclude, it is saliva's ability to trap these free thiols that helps modulate the long-lasting flavors.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Christian Starkenmann, Benedicte Le Calvé, Yvan Niclass, Isabelle Cayeux, Sabine Beccucci, and Myriam Troccaz. Olfactory Perception of Cysteine−S-Conjugates from Fruits and Vegetables. J. Agric. Food Chem., 2008; 56 (20): 9575-9580 DOI: 10.1021/jf801873h

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Bacteria In Mouth Help Make Certain Foods Tasty." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 November 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081110181811.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2008, November 11). Bacteria In Mouth Help Make Certain Foods Tasty. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081110181811.htm
American Chemical Society. "Bacteria In Mouth Help Make Certain Foods Tasty." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081110181811.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

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