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Offspring Of Male Geezers: A New Wrinkle

Date:
January 25, 2009
Source:
Society for the Study of Reproduction
Summary:
Although mammalian males can reproduce until late in life, evidence of hazards to offspring has emerged in human and animal models. Two new studies provide clear, well-controlled data of deleterious effects on the offspring of aged male mice mated to females of prime reproductive age.
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Although mammalian males can reproduce until late in life, evidence of hazards to offspring has emerged in human and animal models.

Two papers in the February 2009 issue of the journal Biology of Reproduction provide clear, well-controlled data of deleterious effects on the offspring of aged male mice mated to females of prime reproductive age.

The offspring from the elderly males exhibit abnormalities not only in several behavioral traits, but also in reproductive fitness and longevity. The early death of offspring sired by old mice was heralded by rapid weight loss.

Moreover, mating the offspring derived from aged males resulted in the production of pups exhibiting decreased weights at weaning when compared with pups from the offspring of younger males: an apparent transgenerational effect.

The defects causing the abnormalities in offspring are unknown and should be the objective of intriguing studies in the future.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for the Study of Reproduction. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Silvia García-Palomares, José F. Pertusa, José Mi ñarro, Miguel A. García-Pérez, Carlos Hermenegildo, Francisco Rausell, Antonio Cano, and Juan J. Tarín. Long-Term Effects of Delayed Fatherhood in Mice on Postnatal Development and Behavioral Traits of Offspring. Biology of Reproduction, 2009; 80 (2): 337 DOI: 10.1095/biolreprod.108.072066
  2. Silvia García-Palomares, Samuel Navarro, José F. Pertusa, Carlos Hermenegildo, Miguel A. García-Pérez, Francisco Rausell, Antonio Cano, and Juan J. Tarín. Delayed Fatherhood in Mice Decreases Reproductive Fitness and Longevity of Offspring. Biology of Reproduction, 2009; 80 (2): 343 DOI: 10.1095/biolreprod.108.073395

Cite This Page:

Society for the Study of Reproduction. "Offspring Of Male Geezers: A New Wrinkle." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 January 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090121214648.htm>.
Society for the Study of Reproduction. (2009, January 25). Offspring Of Male Geezers: A New Wrinkle. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 22, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090121214648.htm
Society for the Study of Reproduction. "Offspring Of Male Geezers: A New Wrinkle." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090121214648.htm (accessed May 22, 2015).

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