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Evolutionary surprise: Eight percent of human genetic material comes from a virus

Date:
January 8, 2010
Source:
University of Texas at Arlington
Summary:
About eight percent of human genetic material comes from a virus and not from our ancestors, according to a new study. The research shows that the genomes of humans and other mammals contain DNA derived from the insertion of bornaviruses, RNA viruses whose replication and transcription takes place in the nucleus.

A new study shows that the genomes of humans and other mammals contain DNA derived from the insertion of bornaviruses, RNA viruses whose replication and transcription takes place in the nucleus.
Credit: iStockphoto

About eight percent of human genetic material comes from a virus and not from our ancestors, according to researchers in Japan and the U.S.

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The study, and an accompanying News & Views article by University of Texas at Arlington biology professor Cιdric Feschotte, is published in the journal Nature.

The research showed that the genomes of humans and other mammals contain DNA derived from the insertion of bornaviruses, RNA viruses whose replication and transcription takes place in the nucleus. Feschotte wrote on recent research led by Professor Keizo Tomonaga at Osaka University in Japan. Feschotte said this virally transmitted DNA may be a cause of mutation and psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and mood disorders.

In his article, Feschotte speculates about the role of such viral insertions in causing mutations with evolutionary and medical consequences.

The assimilation of viral sequences into the host genome is a process referred to as endogenization. This occurs when viral DNA integrates into a chromosome of reproductive cells and is subsequently passed from parent to offspring. Until now, retroviruses were the only viruses known to generate such endogenous copies in vertebrates. But Feschotte said that scientists have found that non-retroviral viruses called bornaviruses have been endogenized repeatedly in mammals throughout evolution.

Bornavirus (BDV) owes its name to the town of Borna, Germany, where a virus epidemic in 1885 wiped out a regiment of cavalry horses. BDV infects a range of birds and mammals, including humans. It is unique because it infects only neurons, establishing a persistent infection in its host's brain, and its entire life cycle takes place in the nucleus of the infected cells. Feschotte said this intimate association of BDV with the cell nucleus prompted researchers to investigate whether bornaviruses may have left behind a record of past infection in the form of endogenous elements. They searched the 234 known eukaryotic genomes (those genomes that have been fully sequenced) for sequences that are similar to that of BDV. "The researchers unearthed a plethora of endogenous Borna-like N (EBLN) elements in many diverse mammals, " Feschotte said.

The scientists also were able to recover spontaneous BDV insertions in the chromosomes of human cultured cells persistently infected by BVD.Based on these data, Feschotte proposes that BDV insertions could be a source of mutations in the brain cells of infected individuals.

"These data yield a testable hypothesis for the alleged, but still controversial, causative association of BDV infection with schizophrenia and mood disorders," Feschotte said. The research in Feschotte 's laboratory, which largely focuses on transposable elements, the genetic elements that are able to move and replicate within the genomes of virtually all living organisms, is representative of the research under way at UT Arlington, an institution of 28,000 students on its way to becoming a nationally recognized, top-tier research university.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Texas at Arlington. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Masayuki Horie, Tomoyuki Honda, Yoshiyuki Suzuki, Yuki Kobayashi, Takuji Daito, Tatsuo Oshida, Kazuyoshi Ikuta, Patric Jern, Takashi Gojobori, John M. Coffin & Keizo Tomonaga. Endogenous non-retroviral RNA virus elements in mammalian genomes. Nature, 2010; 463 (7277): 84 DOI: 10.1038/nature08695
  2. Cιdric Feschotte. Virology: Bornavirus enters the genome. Nature, 2010; 463 (7277): 39 DOI: 10.1038/463039a

Cite This Page:

University of Texas at Arlington. "Evolutionary surprise: Eight percent of human genetic material comes from a virus." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 January 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100107103621.htm>.
University of Texas at Arlington. (2010, January 8). Evolutionary surprise: Eight percent of human genetic material comes from a virus. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100107103621.htm
University of Texas at Arlington. "Evolutionary surprise: Eight percent of human genetic material comes from a virus." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100107103621.htm (accessed March 27, 2015).

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