Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Members of the public to research bird, bat and insect aerobatics

Date:
October 29, 2010
Source:
Wageningen University and Research Centre
Summary:
Researchers are going to involve the general public in scientific research into the way in which birds, insects and even seeds fly. The researchers will purchase a number of extreme high-speed video cameras, so that anyone who is interested can record in detail the flight movements that occur in the natural environment.

Bald Eagle flight.
Credit: Image courtesy of Wageningen University and Research Centre

Researchers of Wageningen University are going to involve the general public in scientific research into the way in which birds, insects and even seeds fly. The enthusiastic team led by researcher, David Lentink, will invest more than one hundred thousand euros in purchasing extreme high-speed video cameras, so that anyone who is interested can record in detail the flight movements that occur in the natural environment.

Related Articles


The Flight Artists team will be asking nature lovers, artists, hobby photographers and other interested members of the public to use the newest, high-speed video techniques to shoot images of flying birds, insects and bats, and also of maple and linden seeds as they spiral to the ground.

The team recently won the final of the Annual Dutch Academic Award. In the run-up to the final of the Annual Academic Prize, more than 700 people registered their interest. High-speed recordings made with infrared light, countless special lenses, lamps and field facilities can show details that are invisible to the naked eye; invisible, either because they are too far away or, more likely, because they are too rapid for the observer.

The fastest speed with high definition quality is 7500 images per second, which is 300 times faster than with an ordinary camera. The resulting detail reveals nature's mastery of aerobatics in such a way that the seemingly simple flight movements of a house sparrow are converted into a spectacular show.

Life in the Dutch natural environment suddenly becomes something out of the ordinary. Thus, scientists working in a newly created discipline become involved with non-professionals while the latter earn, with their unique images, their place in science. Ordinary people can make spectacular movies that are up to now exclusively available to professional documentary makers.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wageningen University and Research Centre. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Wageningen University and Research Centre. "Members of the public to research bird, bat and insect aerobatics." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 October 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101029080354.htm>.
Wageningen University and Research Centre. (2010, October 29). Members of the public to research bird, bat and insect aerobatics. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101029080354.htm
Wageningen University and Research Centre. "Members of the public to research bird, bat and insect aerobatics." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101029080354.htm (accessed November 20, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Your Complicated Job Might Keep Your Brain Young

Your Complicated Job Might Keep Your Brain Young

Newsy (Nov. 20, 2014) Researchers at the University of Edinburgh found the more complex your job is, the sharper your cognitive skills will likely be as you age. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mysterious Glow Worms Found in the Amazon

Mysterious Glow Worms Found in the Amazon

Buzz60 (Nov. 20, 2014) Wildlife photographer Jeff Cremer teamed up with entomologist Aaron Pomerantz and others to investigate a predatory glow worm found in the Amazon. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Huge Snow Covers Buffalo Streets

Raw: Huge Snow Covers Buffalo Streets

AP (Nov. 20, 2014) A new blast of lake-effect snow roared through western New York with thunder and lightning on Thursday, raising to nearly 6 feet the three-day total in parts of the Buffalo area. (Nov. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Report Warns of Global Chocolate Shortage

Report Warns of Global Chocolate Shortage

Buzz60 (Nov. 20, 2014) A new report warns the world could face a 2.2-billion pound chocolate shortage within the next five years. Mike Janela (@mikejanela) explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins