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Study sheds light on tunicate evolution

Date:
July 5, 2011
Source:
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Summary:
Researchers have filled an important gap in the study of tunicate evolution by genetically sequencing 40 new specimens of thaliaceans, gelatinous, free-swimming types of tunicates.

Image of the salp Cyclosalpa pinnata.
Credit: Photo by Larry Madin, Woods Hole Oceaanographic Institution

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) researchers have filled an important gap in the study of tunicate evolution by genetically sequencing 40 new specimens of thaliaceans, gelatinous, free-swimming types of tunicates. Tunicates are a phylum of animals closely related to vertebrates, with a firm, rubbery outer covering called a tunic, from which the name derives.

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Their study was featured on the cover of the June issue of the Journal of Plankton Research.

"Thaliaceans have been poorly represented in previous studies of tunicate evolution," said Annette Govindarajan of WHOI and Northeastern University, who performed the research along with WHOI Director of Research Laurence P. Madin and Ann Bucklin of the University of Connecticut at Avery Point. "Our study included 40 new sequences, which allowed us to make new insights on evolutionary relationships both within the Thaliacea, and between thaliaceans and other tunicates," Govindarajan said.

Thaliaceans play an important role in many ocean ecosystems. They are known for their complex life cycles and their role in the transfer of organic matter from the surface to the deep sea.

The researchers made their discovery by sequencing the gene 18S rDNA. "Relatively little is known about evolutionary relationships within the Thaliacea and between thaliaceans and other tunicates -- for example, how they are related to various groups of ascidians, or sea squirts," Govindarajan said. "Our study presented a molecular phylogeny based on 18S rDNA sequences, including those from 40 newly obtained thaliacean samples."

There are approximately 72 described species of thaliaceans classified in three subgroups--the pyrosomes, salps, and doliolids, all of which are planktonic open-ocean animals that people seldom see. Govindarajan and her colleagues found a close relationship between thaliaceans and other types of tunicates, including sea squirts--bottom-dwelling tunicates that commonly overgrow docks and pilings. "The Thaliacea was monophyletic, indicating that the pyrosomes, salps, and doliolids arose from a common ancestor," she said. "Within the salp lineage, we unexpectedly found the cyclosalp group to be closely related to another salp lineage, despite many morphological and behavioral differences. We also were able to clarify the uncertainty around the salp Weelia (Salpa) cylindrica. Previous work suggested that this species was closely related to species in the genus Salpa, but our results strongly indicated that it is distinct and warrants placement in a separate genus."

Previous tunicate studies have been based on18S rDNA sequences, but thaliaceans were very poorly represented, Govindarajan said. "There are relatively few thaliacean specialists, and specimens are difficult to obtain and identify. Better thaliacean representation allowed us to make new insights on evolutionary relationships both within the Thaliacea and between thaliaceans and other tunicates."

The research was funded by the National Science Foundation's Biological Oceanography Program.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. A. F. Govindarajan, A. Bucklin, L. P. Madin. A molecular phylogeny of the Thaliacea. Journal of Plankton Research, 2010; 33 (6): 843 DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fbq157

Cite This Page:

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. "Study sheds light on tunicate evolution." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 July 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110701121820.htm>.
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. (2011, July 5). Study sheds light on tunicate evolution. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110701121820.htm
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. "Study sheds light on tunicate evolution." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110701121820.htm (accessed January 31, 2015).

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