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Engineered bacteria effectively target tumors, enabling tumor imaging potential in mice

Date:
January 27, 2012
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Tumor-targeted bioluminescent bacteria have been shown for the first time to provide accurate 3-D images of tumors in mice, further advancing the potential for targeted cancer drug delivery.

(a) Whole Body 3D co-registration of lux, FLuc and µCT. Combined luminescence and µCT demonstrating co-localisation of B. breve (bacterial lux - orange) and subcutaneous HCT116-luc2 tumour (FLuc - green). (b) Intratumoural Imaging. Combined µCT and luminescence imaging. Magnification of subcutaneous tumour from mouse in (a), top, side and base view. Viable tumour (FLuc green/blue), vasculature (contrast agent – red) and bacterial (orange/yellow) signals are visualised.
Credit: Michelle Cronin, Ali R. Akin, Sara A. Collins, Jeff Meganck, Jae-Beom Kim, Chwanrow K. Baban, Susan A. Joyce, Gooitzen M. van Dam, Ning Zhang, Douwe van Sinderen, Gerald C. O'Sullivan, Noriyuki Kasahara, Cormac G. Gahan, Kevin P. Francis, Mark Tangney. High Resolution In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging for the Study of Bacterial Tumour Targeting. PLoS ONE, 2012; 7 (1): e30940 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0030940

Tumor-targeted bioluminescent bacteria have been shown for the first time to provide accurate 3-D images of tumors in mice, further advancing the potential for targeted cancer drug delivery, according to a study published in the Jan. 25 issue of the online journal PLoS ONE.

The specially engineered probiotic bacteria, like those found in many yogurts, were intravenously injected into mice with tumors, after which the researchers took full body bioluminescent images. The 3-D images revealed information about the number and location of the bacteria, to the level of precisely revealing where within the tumor the bacteria were living, providing much more information on the interaction of bacteria and tumors than was previously available using similar two-dimensional imaging methods.

According to the authors, led by Mark Tangney of University College Cork in Ireland, "before now, researchers used luminescence to provide an approximation of where a test organism was within the body, and would then follow up with multiple further experiments using different techniques to try to find a precise location."

This new research suggests that such bacteria can be engineered to contain diagnostic or therapeutic agents that would be produced specifically within the tumor for targeted treatment.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Michelle Cronin, Ali R. Akin, Sara A. Collins, Jeff Meganck, Jae-Beom Kim, Chwanrow K. Baban, Susan A. Joyce, Gooitzen M. van Dam, Ning Zhang, Douwe van Sinderen, Gerald C. O'Sullivan, Noriyuki Kasahara, Cormac G. Gahan, Kevin P. Francis, Mark Tangney. High Resolution In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging for the Study of Bacterial Tumour Targeting. PLoS ONE, 2012; 7 (1): e30940 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0030940

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Engineered bacteria effectively target tumors, enabling tumor imaging potential in mice." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 January 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120125172319.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2012, January 27). Engineered bacteria effectively target tumors, enabling tumor imaging potential in mice. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120125172319.htm
Public Library of Science. "Engineered bacteria effectively target tumors, enabling tumor imaging potential in mice." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120125172319.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

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