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New research reveals more about how the brain processes facial expressions and emotions

Date:
October 15, 2012
Source:
Society for Neuroscience (SfN)
Summary:
Research is helping reveal how human and primate brains process and interpret facial expressions, and the role of facial mimicry in everything from deciphering an unclear smile to establishing relationships of power and status.

Research is helping reveal how human and primate brains process and interpret facial expressions, and the role of facial mimicry in everything from deciphering an unclear smile to establishing relationships of power and status.

The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2012, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health.

Facial mimicry -- a social behavior in which the observer automatically activates the same facial muscles as the person she is imitating -- plays a role in learning, understanding, and rapport. Mimicry can activate muscles that control both smiles and frowns, and evoke their corresponding emotions, positive and negative. The studies reveal new roles of facial mimicry and some of its underlying brain circuitry.

Today's new findings show that:

  • Special brains cells dubbed "eye cells" activate in the amygdala of a monkey looking into the eyes of another monkey, even as the monkey mimics the expressions of its counterpart (Katalin Gothard, MD, PhD, abstract 402.02).
  • Social status and self-perceptions of power affect facial mimicry, such that powerful individuals suppress their smile mimicry towards other high-status people, while powerless individuals mimic everyone's smile (Evan Carr, BS, abstract 402.11).
  • Brain imaging studies in monkeys have revealed the specific roles of different regions of the brain in understanding facial identity and emotional expression, including one brain region previously identified for its role in vocal processing (Shih-pi Ku, PhD, abstract 263.22).
  • Subconscious facial mimicry plays a strong role in interpreting the meaning of ambiguous smiles (Sebastian Korb, PhD, abstract 402.23).

Another recent finding discussed shows that:

  • Early difficulties in interactions between parents and infants with cleft lip appear to have a neurological basis, as change in a baby's facial structure can disrupt the way adult brains react to a child (Christine Parsons, PhD).

"Today's findings highlight the role of facial expressions in communication and social behavior," said press conference moderator Martha Farah, PhD, of the University of Pennsylvania, an expert on brain development and poverty. "Brain circuits that interpret the face appear ever more specialized, from primate 'eye cells,' to brain feedback that enables us to discern meaning through facial mimicry."

This research was supported by national funding agencies, such as the National Institutes of Health, as well as private and philanthropic organizations.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Neuroscience (SfN). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society for Neuroscience (SfN). "New research reveals more about how the brain processes facial expressions and emotions." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121015085016.htm>.
Society for Neuroscience (SfN). (2012, October 15). New research reveals more about how the brain processes facial expressions and emotions. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121015085016.htm
Society for Neuroscience (SfN). "New research reveals more about how the brain processes facial expressions and emotions." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121015085016.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

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