Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Even slight temperature increases causing tropical forests to blossom

Date:
July 8, 2013
Source:
Florida State University
Summary:
A new study shows that tropical forests are producing more flowers in response to only slight increases in temperature.

The forest canopy from Barro Colorado Island, Panama shows Tabebuia guayacan in bloom.
Credit: S. Joseph Wright

A new study led by Florida State University researcher Stephanie Pau shows that tropical forests are producing more flowers in response to only slight increases in temperature.

The study examined how changes in temperature, clouds and rainfall affect the number of flowers that tropical forests produce. Results showed that clouds mainly have an effect over short-term seasonal growth, but longer-term changes of these forests appear to be due to temperature. While other studies have used long-term flower production data, this is the first study to combine these data with direct estimates of cloud cover based on satellite information.

The results of the study, "Clouds and Temperature Drive Dynamic Changes in Tropical Flower Production," was published July 7 in the journal Nature Climate Change.

"Tropical forests are commonly thought of as the lungs of the earth and how many flowers they produce is one vital sign of their health," said Pau, an assistant professor in Florida State's Department of Geography. "However, there is a point at which forests can get too warm and flower production will decrease. We're not seeing that yet at the sites we looked at, and whether that happens depends on how much the tropics will continue to warm."

U.S. Geological Survey Senior Scientist Julio Betancourt, who was not involved in the study, described Pau's research as "clever."

"It integrates ground and satellite observations over nearly three decades to tease apart the influence of temperature and cloudiness on local flower production," Betancourt said. "It confirms other recent findings that, in the tropics, even a modest warming can pack quite a punch."

Pau led a team of international researchers who studied seasonal and year-to-year flower production in two contrasting tropical forests -- a seasonally dry forest on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, and an "ever-wet" forest in Luquillo, Puerto Rico.

The seasonally dry site, according to Pau, has been producing more flowers at an average rate of 3 percent each year over the last several decades, an increase that appears to be tied to warming temperatures.

"We studied flowers because their growth is a measure of the reproductive health and overall growth of the forests, and because there is long-term data on flower production available," Pau said.

The amount of sunlight reaching tropical forests due to varying amounts of cloud cover is an important factor, just not the most important when it comes to flower production.

"Clouds are a huge uncertainty in understanding the impacts of climate change on tropical forests," Pau said. "Both sites still appear to respond positively to increases in light availability. Yet temperature was the most consistent factor across multiple time-scales.

"With most projections of future climate change, people have emphasized the impact on high-latitude ecosystems because that is where temperatures will increase the most," Pau said. "The tropics, which are already warm, probably won't experience as much of a temperature increase as high-latitude regions. Even so, we're showing that these tropical forests are still really sensitive to small degrees of change."

Pau conducted the research as part of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) Forecasting Phenology Working Group and with Elizabeth M. Wolkovich of the University of British Columbia's Biodiversity Research Centre; Benjamin I. Cook of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; Christopher J. Nytch of the University of Puerto Rico's Institute for Tropical Ecosystem Studies; James Regetz of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis; Jess K. Zimmerman of the University of Puerto Rico's Institute for Tropical Ecosystem Studies; and S. Joseph Wright of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Florida State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Stephanie Pau, Elizabeth M. Wolkovich, Benjamin I. Cook, Christopher J. Nytch, James Regetz, Jess K. Zimmerman, S. Joseph Wright. Clouds and temperature drive dynamic changes in tropical flower production. Nature Climate Change, 2013; DOI: 10.1038/nclimate1934

Cite This Page:

Florida State University. "Even slight temperature increases causing tropical forests to blossom." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 July 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130708102740.htm>.
Florida State University. (2013, July 8). Even slight temperature increases causing tropical forests to blossom. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130708102740.htm
Florida State University. "Even slight temperature increases causing tropical forests to blossom." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130708102740.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Earth & Climate News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Visitors Feel Part of the Pack at Wolf Preserve

Visitors Feel Part of the Pack at Wolf Preserve

AP (July 31, 2014) Seacrest Wolf Preserve on the northern Florida panhandle allows more than 10,000 visitors each year to get up close and personal with Arctic and British Columbian Wolves. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Florida Panther Rebound Upsets Ranchers

Florida Panther Rebound Upsets Ranchers

AP (July 31, 2014) With Florida's panther population rebounding, some ranchers complain the protected predators are once again killing their calves. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Big Waves In Arctic Ocean Threaten Polar Ice

Big Waves In Arctic Ocean Threaten Polar Ice

Newsy (July 30, 2014) Big waves in parts of the Arctic Ocean are unprecedented, mainly because they used to be covered in ice. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Thousands Flocking to German Crop Circle

Raw: Thousands Flocking to German Crop Circle

AP (July 30, 2014) Thousands of people are trekking to a Bavarian farmer's field to check out a mysterious set of crop circles. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins