Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Sex over survival: Reproductive trait in fish impedes tissue regeneration

Date:
October 14, 2013
Source:
Cell Press
Summary:
New research on the reproductive habits of zebrafish offers an explanation as to why some animals' bodies repair tissues. The research team previously noticed that male zebrafish regenerate their pectoral fins poorly, as compared to females. Their latest findings reveal the basis for this sex-specific regenerative deficiency: structures that are used to improve reproductive success. The scenario represents an example of the tradeoffs between reproduction and survival.

Spiked structures on male zebrafish pectoral fins are important for mating but also produce a potent signaling inhibitor. Presence of this inhibitor disrupts regeneration of fin tissue after amputation injury.
Credit: Developmental Cell, Kang et al.

New research on the reproductive habits of zebrafish offers an explanation as to why some animals' bodies repair tissues. The research team previously noticed that male zebrafish regenerate their pectoral fins poorly, as compared to females. Their latest findings, publishing in the October 14 issue of the Cell Press journal Developmental Cell, reveal the basis for this sex-specific regenerative deficiency: structures that are used to improve reproductive success. The scenario represents an example of the tradeoffs between reproduction and survival.

Led by first author Junsu Kang, the scientists identified anatomical structures that male fish use during mating that produce a signal that impedes regeneration of the pectoral fins after injury. As such, fish appear to trade an ancient ability to regenerate tissue easily for a new-found way of enhancing reproductive success. This valuable information could help scientists begin to explain why humans are less able to regenerate tissue and could also be used to improve the body's tissue regenerative capacity.

"We discovered that male zebrafish have a very important set of structures on their pectoral fins that they use for breeding and that these structures secrete a potent molecular inhibitor of a key signaling pathway to aid their cycles of regular replacement," explains senior author Kenneth Poss of Duke University Medical Center.

Higher vertebrates like mammals generally have a diminished capacity for tissue regeneration compared with lower vertebrates like fish and salamanders. "The biology we describe here suggests a new paradigm for how tissue regenerative capacity may be lost during species evolution," says Poss. The researchers speculate that natural selection acting on traits like sexual features could have detrimental effects on tissue regenerative potential. For example, male zebrafish with more numerous or more effective breeding ornaments -- and thus lower regenerative potential -- might contribute more to the gene pool, phasing out regenerative potential over generations.

Poss notes that growing attention in the field of tissue regeneration is being paid to factors that block signaling pathways. "Our results indicate that the presence or restriction of a pathway inhibitor is critical to whether regeneration occurs normally, providing new fuel for ideas of how to promote regeneration after injury in humans."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cell Press. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kang et al. Local Dkk1 Crosstalk from Breeding Ornaments Impedes Regeneration of Injured Male Zebrafish Fins. Developmental Cell, 2013 DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2013.08.015

Cite This Page:

Cell Press. "Sex over survival: Reproductive trait in fish impedes tissue regeneration." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131014121741.htm>.
Cell Press. (2013, October 14). Sex over survival: Reproductive trait in fish impedes tissue regeneration. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131014121741.htm
Cell Press. "Sex over survival: Reproductive trait in fish impedes tissue regeneration." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131014121741.htm (accessed September 22, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Monday, September 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Raw: San Diego Zoo Welcomes Cheetah Cubs

Raw: San Diego Zoo Welcomes Cheetah Cubs

AP (Sep. 20, 2014) The San Diego Zoo has welcomed two Cheetah cubs to its Safari Park. The nearly three-week-old female cubs are being hand fed and are receiving around the clock care. (Sept. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chocolate Museum Opens in Brussels

Chocolate Museum Opens in Brussels

AFP (Sep. 19, 2014) Considered a "national heritage" in Belgium, chocolate now has a new museum in Brussels. In a former chocolate factory, visitors to the permanent exhibition spaces, workshops and tastings can discover derivatives of the cocoa bean. Duration: 01:00 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

AP (Sep. 19, 2014) A federal jury has convicted three people in connection with an outbreak of salmonella poisoning five years ago that sickened hundreds of people and was linked to a number of deaths. (Sept. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins