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How onions recognize when to bulb

Date:
December 3, 2013
Source:
University of Otago
Summary:
New research from New Zealand identifies the gene that controls onion bulb development will help to breed new varieties tailored to grow in specific conditions.

Onions, the third largest vegetable crop in the world, form a bulb in response to lengthening days, however the molecular mechanisms controlling this response were not previously known.

Research undertaken by Plant & Food Research and the University of Otago has identified the gene controlling bulb development, the first step in discovering genetic markers that can be used as tools to screen conventional breeding programmes for new onion varieties with the right genetic profile.

The research is published in the online journal Nature Communications with related research published in Theoretical and Applied Genetics.

"This research is an excellent example of how new genome technologies can enable major discoveries that, in the past, have been difficult," says Associate Professor Richard Macknight of the University of Otago Department of Biochemistry. "By understanding how these plants control development of the bulb, we can support the breeding of new cultivars that have the right genetic profile to respond to specific growing conditions, ensuring each plant produces a bulb for sale on the market."

"Commercial production of onions relies on cultivars tailored to the environment they are grow in, responding to the right combination of day length and temperature to form a bulb," says John McCallum of Plant & Food Research. "Around 90 million tonnes of onions are produced globally each year, but genetic studies of onions have been limited. Our research is now beginning to link genetics and physiology of onions, allowing industry to tap into more diverse genetic resources and breed products adapted to different and changing environments."

Onion is the second largest vegetable crop in New Zealand, with 586,000 tonnes produced each year and generating $62 million in export revenues.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Otago. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Robyn Lee, Samantha Baldwin, Fernand Kenel, John McCallum, Richard Macknight. FLOWERING LOCUS T genes control onion bulb formation and flowering. Nature Communications, 2013; 4 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms3884
  2. Samantha Baldwin, Roopashree Revanna, Meeghan Pither-Joyce, Martin Shaw, Kathryn Wright, Susan Thomson, Leire Moya, Robyn Lee, Richard Macknight, John McCallum. Genetic analyses of bolting in bulb onion (Allium cepa L.). Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 2013; DOI: 10.1007/s00122-013-2232-4

Cite This Page:

University of Otago. "How onions recognize when to bulb." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 December 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131203091614.htm>.
University of Otago. (2013, December 3). How onions recognize when to bulb. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131203091614.htm
University of Otago. "How onions recognize when to bulb." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131203091614.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

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