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Major enigma solved in atmospheric chemistry

Date:
February 26, 2014
Source:
Forschungszentrum Juelich
Summary:
Aerosols in the atmosphere influence cloud formation, the Earth's radiation balance, and thus the climate. Scientists have now found out how these aerosols are formed from the volatile organic substances emitted naturally into the air. They discovered and characterized extremely low-volatile vapors that cause the aerosols to grow to sizes which are capable of affecting the climate.

Vapours can condense on small aerosol particles (starting from clusters of only a few nanometres in diameter) suspended in the air, causing them to grow to around 100 nanometres -- at which size they can reflect incoming sunlight and act as condensation nuclei for cloud formation in the atmosphere.
Credit: © Pakhnyushchyy / Fotolia

According to their results, these extremely low-volatile organic compounds consist of relatively large molecules which contain an almost equal number of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen atoms. The scientists present a plausible explanation supported by numerous experimental findings of how these vapours are formed almost immediately when plant emissions (e.g. monoterpenes) are released into the air. The vapours can then condense on small aerosol particles (starting from clusters of only a few nanometres in diameter) suspended in the air, causing them to grow to around 100 nanometres -- at which size they can reflect incoming sunlight and act as condensation nuclei for cloud formation in the atmosphere.

The researchers' findings have bridged a major gap in knowledge in atmospheric and climate research. "Thanks to our much improved understanding of the role that naturally occurring substances in the atmosphere play in the formation of organic aerosol particles, we will in future be able to make more reliable assessments of their impact on cloud formation and sunlight scattering, and thus on climate," says Dr. Thomas F. Mentel from Jülich's Institute of Energy and Climate Research -- Troposphere (IEK-8).

The findings are based essentially on measurements performed at Forschungszentrum Jülich in a special 1450 litre glass chamber using a combination of several recently developed mass spectrometry methods, with instruments from Jülich, the University of Helsinki (Finland), and the University of Washington (Seattle, USA). Combined, these produced one of the most comprehensive data sets ever acquired, showing how organic emissions from trees can oxidize to form organic aerosols.

Experts consider a good understanding of the relationship between the increase in soil temperature, plant emissions, aerosol formation, and cloud formation to be essential for predicting future climate development correctly. "Our current research findings will help to improve computer models of the atmosphere and reduce existing uncertainties in climate prediction," says Prof. Andreas Wahner, director at IEK-8.

"What really made these new findings possible were the new mass spectrometry methods, together with the combined efforts and expertise of all the international collaborators involved," says the article's lead author Dr. Mikael Ehn, currently university lecturer at the University of Helsinki. In addition to the institutions at Jülich, Helsinki, and Seattle, the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (Leipzig, Germany), the University of Copenhagen (Denmark), Aerodyne Research Inc. (USA), and Tampere University of Technology (Finland) contributed to the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Forschungszentrum Juelich. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mikael Ehn, Joel A. Thornton, Einhard Kleist, Mikko Sipilä, Heikki Junninen, Iida Pullinen, Monika Springer, Florian Rubach, Ralf Tillmann, Ben Lee, Felipe Lopez-Hilfiker, Stefanie Andres, Ismail-Hakki Acir, Matti Rissanen, Tuija Jokinen, Siegfried Schobesberger, Juha Kangasluoma, Jenni Kontkanen, Tuomo Nieminen, Theo Kurtén, Lasse B. Nielsen, Solvejg Jørgensen, Henrik G. Kjaergaard, Manjula Canagaratna, Miikka Dal Maso, Torsten Berndt, Tuukka Petäjä, Andreas Wahner, Veli-Matti Kerminen, Markku Kulmala, Douglas R. Worsnop, Jürgen Wildt, Thomas F. Mentel. A large source of low-volatility secondary organic aerosol. Nature, 2014; 506 (7489): 476 DOI: 10.1038/nature13032

Cite This Page:

Forschungszentrum Juelich. "Major enigma solved in atmospheric chemistry." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140226132958.htm>.
Forschungszentrum Juelich. (2014, February 26). Major enigma solved in atmospheric chemistry. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140226132958.htm
Forschungszentrum Juelich. "Major enigma solved in atmospheric chemistry." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140226132958.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

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