Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Molecular clue to complex mystery of auxin signaling in plants

Date:
March 24, 2014
Source:
Washington University in St. Louis
Summary:
Plants fine-tune the response of their cells to the potent plant hormone auxin by means of large families of proteins that either step on the gas or put on the brake in auxin’s presence. Scientists have learned that one of these proteins, a transcription factor, has an interaction region that, like a button magnet, has a positive and negative face. Because of this domain, the protein can bind two other proteins or even chains of proteins arranged back-to-front.

The double-sided interaction domain may allow multi-protein chains to form. In Korasick’s crystal, five of the ARF7 PB1 domains stuck to one another, forming a pentamer. “It was really beautiful to look at in the software, because you could actually see its spirals and turns,” said Korasick.
Credit: Strader, Jez et al.

Wikipedia lists 65 adjectives that botanists use to describe the shapes of plant leaves. In English (rather than Latin) they mean the leaf is lance-shaped, spear-shaped, kidney-shaped, diamond shaped, arrow-head-shaped, egg-shaped, circular, spoon-shaped , heart-shaped, tear-drop-shaped or sickle-shaped -- among other possibilities.

How does the plant "know" how to make these shapes? The answer is by controlling the distribution of a plant hormone called auxin, which determines the rate at which plant cells divide and lengthen.

But how can one molecule make so many different patterns? Because the hormone's effects are mediated by the interplay between large families of proteins that either step on the gas or put on the brake when auxin is around.

In recent years as more and more of these proteins were discovered, the auxin signaling machinery began to seem baroque to the point of being unintelligible.

Now the Strader and Jez labs at Washington University in St. Louis have made a discovery about one of the proteins in the auxin signaling network that may prove key to understanding the entire network.

In the March 24 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences they explain that they were able to crystallize a key protein called a transcription factor and work out its structure. The interaction domain of the protein, they learned, folds into a flat paddle with a positively charged face and a negatively charged face. These faces allow the proteins to snap together like magnets, forming long chains, or oligomers.

We have some evidence that proteins chain in plant cells as well as in solution, said senior author Lucia Strader, PhD, assistant professor of biology and an auxin expert. By varying the length of these chains, plants may fine-tune the response of individual cells to auxin to produce detailed patterns such as the toothed lobes of the cilantro leaf.

Combinatorial explosion Sculpting leaves is just one of many roles auxin plays in plants. Among other things the hormone helps make plants bend toward the light, roots grow down and shoots grow up, fruits develop and fruits fall off.

"The most potent form of the hormone is indole-3-acetic acid, abbreviated IAA, and my lab members joke that IAA really stands for Involved in Almost Everything," Strader said.

The backstory here is that whole families of proteins intervene between auxin and genes that respond to auxin by making proteins. In the model plant Aribidopsis thaliana these include 5 transcription factors that activate genes when auxin is present (called ARFs) and 29 repressor proteins that block the transcription factors by binding to them (Aux/IAA proteins). A third family marks repressors for destruction.

"Different combinations of these proteins are present in each cell," said Strader. "On top of that, some combinations interact more strongly than others and some of the transcription factors also interact with one another."

In an idle moment David Korasick, a graduate fellow in the Strader and Jez labs and first author on the PNAS article, did a back-of-the-envelope calculation to put a number on the complexity of the system they were trying to understand. From a strictly mathematical point of view there are 3,828 possible combinations of the auxin-related Arabidopsis proteins. That is assuming interactions involve only one of each type of protein; if multiples are possible, the number, of course, explodes.

To make any headway, Strader said, we had a better understanding of how these proteins interact. The rule in protein chemistry is the opposite of the one in design: instead of form following function, function follows form.

So to figure out a protein's form -- the way it folds in space -- they turned to the Jez lab, which specializes in protein crystallography, essentially a form of high-resolution microscopy that allows protein structures to be visualized at the atomic level.

Korasick had the job of crystallizing ARF7, a transcription factor that helps, Arabidopsis bend toward the light. With the help of Joseph Jez, PhD, associate professor of biology, Corey Westfall, and Soon Goo Lee), Korasick cut "floppy bits" off the protein that might have made it hard to crystallize, leaving just the part of the protein where it interacts with repressor molecules.

After he had that construct, crystallization was remarkably fast. He set up his first drops in solution wells on the 4th of July. The protein crystallized with a fuss, and he ran the crystals up to the Advanced Photon Source at the Argonne National Laboratory outside Chicago. By August 1 he had the diffraction data he needed to solve the protein's structure.

Surprise, surprise The previous model for the interaction between a repressor and a transcription factor -- a model that had stood for 15 years, Strader said- was that the repressor lay flat on the transcription factor, two domains on the repressor matching up with the corresponding two domains on the transcription factor.

The structural model Korasick developed showed that the two domains fold together to form a single domain, called a PB1 domain. A PB1 domain is a protein interaction module that can be found in animals and fungi as well as plants.

The repressor proteins, which are predicted to have PB1 domains identical to that of the ARF transcription factor, then stick to one or the other side of the transcription factor's PB1 domain, preventing it from doing its job. Experiments showed that there had to be a repressor protein stuck to both faces of the transcription factor's PB1 domain to repress the activity of auxin.

This means the model, which pairs a single repressor protein with a single transcription factor, is wrong, Strader said.

"Nor can we limit the interactions to just two," she said. "It could be hundreds for all we know."

In Korasick's crystal five of the ARF7 PB1 domains stuck to one another, forming a pentamer.

"I like to think of the PB1 domains as magnets, " Strader said. "Like magnets, they can stick together, back-to-front, to form long chains."

"But we have to put an asterisk next to that," Korasick said, "because it's possible it's an artifact of crystallography and doesn't work that way in living plants."

But both Strader and Korasick suspect that it does. Strader points out that the complexity of the auxin signaling system has increased over evolutionary time as plants became fancier. A simple plant like the moss Physcomitrella patens has fewer signaling proteins than a complicated plant like soybean.

"Probably what that's saying is that it's really, really important for a plant to be able to modulate auxin signaling, to have the right amount in each cell, to balance positive and negative growth," Korasick said.

"The difference between plants and animals," said Strader, "is that plants have rigid cell walls. So when a plant cell decides to divide itself or length itself, that's a permanent decision, which is why it's so tightly controlled."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Washington University in St. Louis. The original article was written by Diana Lutz. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. David A. Korasick, Corey S. Westfall, Soon Goo Lee, Max H. Nanao, Renaud Dumas, Gretchen Hagen, Thomas J. Guilfoyle, Joseph M. Jez, and Lucia C. Strader. Molecular basis for AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR protein interaction and the control of auxin response repression. PNAS, March 2014 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1400074111

Cite This Page:

Washington University in St. Louis. "Molecular clue to complex mystery of auxin signaling in plants." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140324153930.htm>.
Washington University in St. Louis. (2014, March 24). Molecular clue to complex mystery of auxin signaling in plants. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140324153930.htm
Washington University in St. Louis. "Molecular clue to complex mystery of auxin signaling in plants." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140324153930.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rodents Rampant in Gardens Around Louvre

Rodents Rampant in Gardens Around Louvre

AP (July 29, 2014) Food scraps and other items left on the grounds by picnickers brings unwelcome visitors to the grounds of the world famous and popular Louvre Museum in Paris. (July 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jane Goodall Warns Great Apes Face Extinction

Jane Goodall Warns Great Apes Face Extinction

AFP (July 29, 2014) The world's great apes face extinction within decades, renowned chimpanzee expert Jane Goodall warned Tuesday in a call to arms to ensure man's closest relatives are not wiped out. Duration: 00:58 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Face Can Leave A Good Or Bad First Impression

How Your Face Can Leave A Good Or Bad First Impression

Newsy (July 29, 2014) Researchers have found certain facial features can make us seem more attractive or trustworthy. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Rat Infestation at Paris' Tuileries Garden

Rat Infestation at Paris' Tuileries Garden

AFP (July 29, 2014) An infestation of rats is causing concern among tourists at Paris' most famous park -- the Tuileries garden next to the Louvre Museum. Duration: 00:54 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins