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Beer marinade could reduce levels of potentially harmful substances in grilled meats

Date:
March 26, 2014
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
The smells of summer -- the sweet fragrance of newly opened flowers, the scent of freshly cut grass and the aroma of meats cooking on the backyard grill -- will soon be upon us. Now, researchers are reporting that the very same beer that many people enjoy at backyard barbeques could, when used as a marinade, help reduce the formation of potentially harmful substances in grilled meats.

Grilled pork ribs on the grill.
Credit: © amenic181 / Fotolia

The smells of summer -- the sweet fragrance of newly opened flowers, the scent of freshly cut grass and the aroma of meats cooking on the backyard grill -- will soon be upon us. Now, researchers are reporting that the very same beer that many people enjoy at backyard barbeques could, when used as a marinade, help reduce the formation of potentially harmful substances in grilled meats. The study appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

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I.M.P.L.V.O. Ferreira and colleagues explain that past studies have shown an association between consumption of grilled meats and a high incidence of colorectal cancer. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are substances that can form when meats are cooked at very high temperatures, like on a backyard grill. And high levels of PAHs, which are also in cigarette smoke and car exhaust, are associated with cancers in laboratory animals, although it's uncertain if that's true for people. Nevertheless, the European Union Commission Regulation has established the most suitable indicators for the occurrence and carcinogenic potency of PAHs in food and attributed maximum levels for these compounds in foods. Beer, wine or tea marinades can reduce the levels of some potential carcinogens in cooked meat, but little was known about how different beer marinades affect PAH levels, until now.

The researchers grilled samples of pork marinated for four hours in Pilsner beer, non-alcoholic Pilsner beer or a black beer ale, to well-done on a charcoal grill. Black beer had the strongest effect, reducing the levels of eight major PAHs by more than half compared with unmarinated pork. "Thus, the intake of beer marinated meat can be a suitable mitigation strategy," say the researchers.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Olga Viegas, Iria Yebra-Pimentel, Elena Martνnez-Carballo, Jesus Simal-Gandara, Isabel M. P. L. V. O. Ferreira. Effect of Beer Marinades on Formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Charcoal-Grilled Pork. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2014; 62 (12): 2638 DOI: 10.1021/jf404966w

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Beer marinade could reduce levels of potentially harmful substances in grilled meats." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140326102725.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2014, March 26). Beer marinade could reduce levels of potentially harmful substances in grilled meats. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140326102725.htm
American Chemical Society. "Beer marinade could reduce levels of potentially harmful substances in grilled meats." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140326102725.htm (accessed April 19, 2015).

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