Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Drastic cut in electricity bill for supermarket in Norway

Date:
June 6, 2014
Source:
SINTEF
Summary:
A newly built mini-supermarket was opened last autumn in Norway by a government minister to the sound of a brass band. Throughout the winter, it used 30 per cent less electricity than four comparable stores in the capital of mid-Norway, where of course the outdoor temperature was the same for all of them.

A Norwegian supermarket gets by with just over two-thirds of the electricity used by similar stores.

The newly built mini-supermarket in Trondheim was opened last autumn by a government minister to the sound of a brass band. Throughout the winter, it used 30 per cent less electricity than four comparable stores in the capital of mid-Norway, where of course the outdoor temperature was the same for all of them.

Smart use of daylight and waste heat

The whole energy chain in the store was designed in the course of a research project led by senior scientist Armin Hafner of SINTEF Energy Research. He is convinced that the store is the most energy-efficient example of its type in Norway.

"I am quite certain we can put it like that. There is not another free-standing supermarket in Norway whose energy consumption is as low as this," says Hafner, indicating the interior of the brightly-lit premises, stacked full of food and other necessities.

According to the project manager, the store's modest appetite for energy is the result of two energy-efficiency strategies:

• Lighting control: An automatic control system switches off the ceiling lights when sufficient daylight enters the premises. Faηades made of a transparent aerogel insulation material distribute daylight efficiently throughout the store. Use of this material has also eliminated the need to install expensive sun-blind systems.

• Fully integrated ventilation, refrigeration and heating system: Surplus heat from refrigeration units is temporarily stored in tanks, and when needed is returned to the store via its ventilation and underfloor heating systems. In addition, four 170 metre-deep energy storage wells have been drilled outside the building. These supply energy that can be used for air-conditioning and dehumidifier units in summer, and as additional heat source during the winter months (heat pump mode). There will be no direct use of electricity for heating -- an inefficient way of using energy.

"Our secret is that we store the heat that we already have and use it intelligently," says Hafner.

Next step: series production

These energy solutions were designed as part of the CREATIV competence project, which receives financial support from the Research Council of Norway. Project members include the supermarket chain Rema1000 and industrial supply companies Danfoss and Systemair. The Snψhetta architectural partnership designed the premises.

None of the partners involved in the concept wishes to hide the fact that the cost of the supermarket was higher than most local stores. Now, scientifically designed energy measurements will lay the foundations for series production designs, thereby lowering the cost of similar solutions. The idea is that the equipment and system manufacturers will employ them in other stores, both in Norway and abroad.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by SINTEF. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

SINTEF. "Drastic cut in electricity bill for supermarket in Norway." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140606091539.htm>.
SINTEF. (2014, June 6). Drastic cut in electricity bill for supermarket in Norway. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140606091539.htm
SINTEF. "Drastic cut in electricity bill for supermarket in Norway." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140606091539.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

Share This



More Earth & Climate News

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Traditional Farming Methods Gaining Ground in Mali

Traditional Farming Methods Gaining Ground in Mali

AFP (Oct. 20, 2014) — He is leading a one man agricultural revolution in Mali - Oumar Diatabe uses traditional farming methods to get the most out of his land and is teaching others across the country how to do the same. Duration: 01:44 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Detroit's Money Woes Led To U.N.-Condemned Water Cutoffs

How Detroit's Money Woes Led To U.N.-Condemned Water Cutoffs

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) — The United Nations says water is a human right, but should it be free? Detroit has cut off water to residents who can't pay, and the U.N. isn't happy. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-Fuel Impala

Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-Fuel Impala

3BL Media (Oct. 20, 2014) — Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-fuel Impala Video provided by 3BL
Powered by NewsLook.com
White Rhino's Death In Kenya Means Just 6 Are Left

White Rhino's Death In Kenya Means Just 6 Are Left

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) — Suni, a rare northern white rhino at Ol Pejeta Conservancy, died Friday. This, as many media have pointed out, leaves people fearing extinction. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins