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Emerging Field Of Neuroecology Bridges Neural Basis Of Behavior And Ecological Consequences

Date:
December 18, 2007
Source:
Marine Biological Laboratory
Summary:
Neuroecology bridges a critical gap between studying the neural basis of behavior (neuroethology) and evaluating the consequences of that behavior at the ecological levels of populations and communities. A squid escapes a predator by clouding the water with ink -- but is this a visual defense, or are there chemical implications for the ecosystem as well?
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Neuroecology bridges a critical gap between studying the neural basis of behavior (neuroethology) and evaluating the consequences of that behavior at the ecological levels of populations and communities.

A plant laces its leaves with a noxious chemical, forcing a hungry herbivore to choose between starving, eating a potentially toxic item, or moving on. A newt secretes a potent neurotoxin to defend against predators, unwittingly setting off a cascade of effects in its freshwater pond, where other inhabitants co-opt the toxin for different uses. A squid escapes a predator by clouding the water with ink -- but is this a visual defense, or are there chemical implications for the ecosystem as well?

These and other real-world scenarios are explored in a virtual symposium on the new field of neuroecology in the December issue of The Biological Bulletin. This just-emerging field bridges the gap between studying the neural basis of behavior (neuroethology) and evaluating the consequences of that behavior at the ecological levels of populations and communities.

"Neuroecology recognizes a continuum that runs from physiology to individual behavior to populations and communities," says Richard K. Zimmer of the University of California, Los Angeles, who organized the virtual symposium with Charles D. Derby of Georgia State University.

"Rarely do scientific investigations link in these different scales of biology. And this is a gap that is especially critical to cross. There is a treasure trove of important discoveries to be made about how populations are regulated, in this case by behavior and the physiology that determines behavior."

"The tools are now available to work on neuroecology at a wide range of levels of biological organization," says Zimmer. "An investigator of behavior doesn't have to stop at the level of cellular physiology or individual organisms; it is now possible to identify the consequences for energy and material flow throughout entire food webs, and for distributions and abundances of organisms within communities. There will continue to be real payoffs from making these broad connections."


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Materials provided by Marine Biological Laboratory. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Cite This Page:

Marine Biological Laboratory. "Emerging Field Of Neuroecology Bridges Neural Basis Of Behavior And Ecological Consequences." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 December 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071217092943.htm>.
Marine Biological Laboratory. (2007, December 18). Emerging Field Of Neuroecology Bridges Neural Basis Of Behavior And Ecological Consequences. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 26, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071217092943.htm
Marine Biological Laboratory. "Emerging Field Of Neuroecology Bridges Neural Basis Of Behavior And Ecological Consequences." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071217092943.htm (accessed May 26, 2017).

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