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Genetic history of tomatoes revealed by new sequencing

Date:
October 14, 2014
Source:
University of California - Davis
Summary:
The sequencing of 360 tomato varieties has yielded a 'genetic history' of the popular food crop. An important finding is that specific regions of the tomato genome were unintentionally depleted in genetic variation: for example, in DNA around genes conferring larger fruit size or genes for resistance to diseases afflicting tomato plants.
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This week, an international team of researchers, led by the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences in Beijing, is publishing in the journal Nature Genetics a brief genomic history of tomato breeding, based on sequencing of 360 varieties of the tomato plant.

The C.M. Rick Tomato Genetics Resource Center here at UC Davis played an important role in this study by providing seed of both cultivated tomato varieties and related wild species.

This study, which builds on the first tomato genome sequence completed just two years ago, shows in great detail how the processes of early domestication and modern breeding influenced the genetic makeup of cultivated tomatoes. (UC Davis researchers also led an effort to sequence the genome of a wild relative of the cultivated tomato.)

Analysis of the genome sequences of these 360 varieties and wild strains shows which regions of the genome were under selection during domestication and breeding. The study identified two independent sets of genes responsible for making the fruit of modern commercial tomatoes 100 times larger than their wild ancestors.

An important finding is that specific regions of the tomato genome were unintentionally depleted in genetic variation: for example, in DNA around genes conferring larger fruit size or genes for resistance to diseases afflicting tomato plants.

These stretches of genetic uniformity illustrate the need to increase overall genetic diversity in modern varieties and highlight the important role that the Rick Tomato Genetics Resource Center and similar collections play in housing much of the genetic variability that will be critical for future breeding and research on tomato.


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of California - Davis. Original written by Roger Chetelat. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Tao Lin, Guangtao Zhu, Junhong Zhang, Xiangyang Xu, Qinghui Yu, Zheng Zheng, Zhonghua Zhang, Yaoyao Lun, Shuai Li, Xiaoxuan Wang, Zejun Huang, Junming Li, Chunzhi Zhang, Taotao Wang, Yuyang Zhang, Aoxue Wang, Yancong Zhang, Kui Lin, Chuanyou Li, Guosheng Xiong, Yongbiao Xue, Andrea Mazzucato, Mathilde Causse, Zhangjun Fei, James J Giovannoni, Roger T Chetelat, Dani Zamir, Thomas Städler, Jingfu Li, Zhibiao Ye, Yongchen Du, Sanwen Huang. Genomic analyses provide insights into the history of tomato breeding. Nature Genetics, 2014; DOI: 10.1038/ng.3117

Cite This Page:

University of California - Davis. "Genetic history of tomatoes revealed by new sequencing." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 October 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/10/141014170837.htm>.
University of California - Davis. (2014, October 14). Genetic history of tomatoes revealed by new sequencing. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2024 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/10/141014170837.htm
University of California - Davis. "Genetic history of tomatoes revealed by new sequencing." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/10/141014170837.htm (accessed April 18, 2024).

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