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Precision oncology could be tailor-made for metastatic prostate cancer

Tissue from a single metastasis could provide all the information needed to custom-design therapy for patients with advanced prostate cancer

Date:
February 29, 2016
Source:
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Summary:
Metastatic prostate cancer, where better therapeutic strategies are desperately needed, appears to be tailor-made for precision oncology, according to a new study. Researchers found that a single metastasis within an individual patient can provide consistent molecular information to help guide therapy in metastatic prostate cancer.
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Senior and corresponding author Dr. Peter S. Nelson is a prostate cancer researcher at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.
Credit: Fred Hutch file

Metastatic prostate cancer, where better therapeutic strategies are desperately needed, appears to be tailor-made for precision oncology, according to a new study by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. They found that a single metastasis within an individual patient can provide consistent molecular information to help guide therapy in metastatic prostate cancer.

The research showed that though they are very complex, prostate cancer metastases within an individual patient are strikingly similar in their molecular characteristics, while metastases from different patients have very dissimilar characteristics. This suggests that patients could benefit from individualized therapy and that a single biopsy will likely provide enough information to guide that therapy.

Evidence has been growing that molecular characteristics of original or primary tumors, which often take decades to develop, can exhibit substantial heterogeneity, or variation in the composition of cancer-causing genes in different areas within the tumors. In contrast, scientists have little information about the diversity to be found in metastases, the tumors that arise from cells that have broken free and traveled far from the first tumor. When cancer spreads, it often relocates to several distant sites within an individual, leading to the question of whether obtaining a sample of one metastatic site would provide information that is relevant for guiding therapy of the other sites of spread. Uniformity among metastases within a patient would ensure that therapies designed to target a specific metastasis would likely treat all of a patient's metastases.


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Materials provided by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Akash Kumar, Ilsa Coleman, Colm Morrissey, Xiaotun Zhang, Lawrence D True, Roman Gulati, Ruth Etzioni, Hamid Bolouri, Bruce Montgomery, Thomas White, Jared M Lucas, Lisha G Brown, Ruth F Dumpit, Navonil DeSarkar, Celestia Higano, Evan Y Yu, Roger Coleman, Nikolaus Schultz, Min Fang, Paul H Lange, Jay Shendure, Robert L Vessella, Peter S Nelson. Substantial interindividual and limited intraindividual genomic diversity among tumors from men with metastatic prostate cancer. Nature Medicine, 2016; DOI: 10.1038/nm.4053

Cite This Page:

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. "Precision oncology could be tailor-made for metastatic prostate cancer: Tissue from a single metastasis could provide all the information needed to custom-design therapy for patients with advanced prostate cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 February 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160229135146.htm>.
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. (2016, February 29). Precision oncology could be tailor-made for metastatic prostate cancer: Tissue from a single metastasis could provide all the information needed to custom-design therapy for patients with advanced prostate cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160229135146.htm
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. "Precision oncology could be tailor-made for metastatic prostate cancer: Tissue from a single metastasis could provide all the information needed to custom-design therapy for patients with advanced prostate cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160229135146.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

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