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Brief report on mucocutaneous findings, course in adult with Zika virus infection

Date:
May 11, 2016
Source:
The JAMA Network Journals
Summary:
What are the mucocutaneous (skin and mucous membrane) features of a 44-year-old man who returned from a six-day vacation to Puerto Rico with confirmatory testing for Zika virus? Researchers describe the observations in a new article.
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What are the mucocutaneous (skin and mucous membrane) features of a 44-year-old man who returned from a six-day vacation to Puerto Rico with confirmatory testing for Zika virus?

Amit Garg, M.D., of the Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, N.Y., and coauthors describe the observations in an article published online by JAMA Dermatology.

The man had a diffuse papular (bumpy) descending eruption (rash), petechiae (spots) on his palate and hyperemic sclerae (bloodshot eyes).

The authors suggest an awareness of mucocutaneous findings associated with Zika virus infection can aid health care providers in recognizing it early and also eliminating it from consideration when patients present with other more common erythematous eruptions (red rashes on the skin).


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Materials provided by The JAMA Network Journals. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Error: could not find data. Zika Virus in the Americas: An Obscure Arbovirus Comes Calling. JAMA Dermatology, May 2016 DOI: 10.1001/jamadermatol.2016.1433

Cite This Page:

The JAMA Network Journals. "Brief report on mucocutaneous findings, course in adult with Zika virus infection." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 May 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160511122510.htm>.
The JAMA Network Journals. (2016, May 11). Brief report on mucocutaneous findings, course in adult with Zika virus infection. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 25, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160511122510.htm
The JAMA Network Journals. "Brief report on mucocutaneous findings, course in adult with Zika virus infection." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160511122510.htm (accessed May 25, 2017).

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