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Lifestyle changes prevent cognitive decline even in genetically susceptible individuals

Date:
January 25, 2018
Source:
University of Eastern Finland
Summary:
Enhanced lifestyle counselling prevents cognitive decline even in people who are carriers of the APOE4 gene, a common risk factor of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study.
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Enhanced lifestyle counselling prevents cognitive decline even in people who are carriers of the APOE4 gene, a common risk factor of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study published in JAMA Neurology.

The two-year FINGER trial involved 60-77 year-old people living in Finland and with risk factors for memory disorders. The study participants were divided into two groups: one of the groups was given regular lifestyle counselling and the other enhanced lifestyle counselling. Enhanced counselling involved nutrition counselling, physical and cognitive exercises, and support in managing the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

Earlier findings from the FINGER trial have shown that the regular lifestyle counselling group had a significantly increased risk of cognitive and functional impairment compared to the intervention group, i.e. the group receiving enhanced counselling.

Now the researchers analysed whether the presence of the APOE4 gene affected the intervention results. The analysis included 1,109 persons of whom 362 were carriers of the APOE4 gene. The findings show that enhanced lifestyle counselling prevented cognitive decline despite the presence of the risk gene. Analyses carried out within the groups also indicate that the intervention results might even be better in carriers of the APOE4 gene.

"Many people worry that genetic risk factors for dementia may thwart potential benefits from healthy lifestyle changes. We were very happy to see that this was not the case in our intervention, which was started early, before the onset of substantial cognitive impairment," says Adjunct Professor Alina Solomon, the lead author of the study.

Professor Miia Kivipelto, the principal investigator of the FINGER trial, adds: "The FINGER intervention model is now being adapted and tested globally in the World Wide FINGERS initiative. New clinical trials in diverse populations with a variety of geographical and cultural backgrounds will help us formulate global dementia prevention strategies."

The study was carried out in collaboration between the University of Eastern Finland, the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare, the University of Helsinki, the University of Oulu, and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden.


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Materials provided by University of Eastern Finland. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Alina Solomon, Heidi Turunen, Tiia Ngandu, Markku Peltonen, Esko Levälahti, Seppo Helisalmi, Riitta Antikainen, Lars Bäckman, Tuomo Hänninen, Antti Jula, Tiina Laatikainen, Jenni Lehtisalo, Jaana Lindström, Teemu Paajanen, Satu Pajala, Anna Stigsdotter-Neely, Timo Strandberg, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Hilkka Soininen, Miia Kivipelto. Effect of the Apolipoprotein E Genotype on Cognitive Change During a Multidomain Lifestyle Intervention. JAMA Neurology, 2018; DOI: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2017.4365

Cite This Page:

University of Eastern Finland. "Lifestyle changes prevent cognitive decline even in genetically susceptible individuals." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 January 2018. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180125101309.htm>.
University of Eastern Finland. (2018, January 25). Lifestyle changes prevent cognitive decline even in genetically susceptible individuals. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 13, 2024 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180125101309.htm
University of Eastern Finland. "Lifestyle changes prevent cognitive decline even in genetically susceptible individuals." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180125101309.htm (accessed July 13, 2024).

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