New! Sign up for our free email newsletter.
Science News
from research organizations

Attosecond physics: A keen sense for molecules

Date:
February 23, 2018
Source:
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Summary:
Laser physicists have developed an extremely powerful broadband infrared light source. This light source opens up a whole new range of opportunities in medicine, life science, and material analysis.
Share:
FULL STORY

Munich based Laser physicists have developed an extremely powerful broadband infrared light source. This light source opens up a whole new range of opportunities in medicine, life science, and material analysis.

With the help of Infrared light, researchers are able to go in search of the small particles which shape and determine our lives. The phenomenon, in which infrared light sets molecules in vibration, is pivotal in this search. Scientists are exploiting this phenomenon by using infrared light to analyze the molecular makeup of samples. In the hope that this analysis can become even more exact, the laser physicists from the Laboratory of Attosecond Physics at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics have developed an infrared light source that has an enormously broad spectrum of wavelengths.

With this system, which has an output power of 19 Watt, researchers have achieved the broadest simultaneous infrared coverage from a solid state laser. Moreover, the infrared laser pulses emitted should correspond to a sub-cycle pulse in time domain.

This new light source opens up countless opportunities for the physicists of better understanding the fundamental properties of solid and soft matter. The analysis of light spectrums after interactions with material with infrared spectroscopy and microscopy allows the more precise and accurate conceptualization of research methods.

The LAP team utilizes these methods for driving the so-called "Broadband Infrared Diagnostics" project. In the framework of this project, the scientists are interested in assessing the molecular makeup of blood and breath.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jinwei Zhang, Ka Fai Mak, Nathalie Nagl, Marcus Seidel, Dominik Bauer, Dirk Sutter, Vladimir Pervak, Ferenc Krausz, Oleg Pronin. Multi-mW, few-cycle mid-infrared continuum spanning from 500 to 2250 cm−1. Light: Science & Applications, 2018; 7 (2): 17180 DOI: 10.1038/lsa.2017.180

Cite This Page:

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. "Attosecond physics: A keen sense for molecules." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 February 2018. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180223122348.htm>.
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. (2018, February 23). Attosecond physics: A keen sense for molecules. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2024 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180223122348.htm
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. "Attosecond physics: A keen sense for molecules." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180223122348.htm (accessed April 17, 2024).

Explore More

from ScienceDaily

RELATED STORIES