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Losartan is not effective in reducing COVID-19 lung injuries, researchers find

Date:
March 16, 2022
Source:
University of Minnesota Medical School
Summary:
Research found that a common blood pressure medication -- losartan -- is not effective in reducing lung injury in patients with COVID-19.
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A study published in JAMA Network Open, from the University of Minnesota, found that a common blood pressure medication -- losartan -- is not effective in reducing lung injury in patients with COVID-19.

This drug was investigated based on early reports suggesting benefit in preclinical models of the 2003 SARS virus, a close family member to the current SARS-CoV-2 virus. This study was conducted across 12 U.S. academic research institutions.

The U of M Medical School and School of Public Health research team sought to determine if a common blood pressure medication might decrease lung injury in patients admitted to the hospital with COVID-19. Their results found that losartan treatment did not reduce lung injury in patients admitted with COVID-19, and had no effect on mortality.

The researchers also found that critically-ill patients treated with losartan needed additional, temporary blood pressure support -- though this did not lead to worse outcomes overall.

"Even though this particular drug was not effective for the treatment of COVID-19, repurposing inexpensive and relatively safe medications remains an important approach to contain healthcare costs," said Michael Puskarich, MD, an associate professor in emergency medicine at the U of M Medical School and co-author of this study.

"Finding effective treatments for COVID-19 that can be widely used across both the developed and developing world remains an important ongoing area of investigation," Puskarich said, who is also an emergency physician at Hennepin Healthcare.

This study was funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The researchers note that more studies of protein and cellular signaling from ALPS-COVID trial participants are ongoing.

"We hope that future study findings of these proteins may show insights into why the body responds the way it does to COVID-19," said Christopher Tignanelli, MD, MS, FACS, FAMIA, an assistant professor in surgery at the U of M Medical School and co-author on this study. "Critically, this will help us understand why some people develop severe disease following COVID-19 infection and others are asymptomatic."


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Minnesota Medical School. Original written by Kat Dodge. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Michael A. Puskarich, Nicholas E. Ingraham, Lisa H. Merck, Brian E. Driver, David A. Wacker, Lauren Page Black, Alan E. Jones, Courtney V. Fletcher, Andrew M. South, Thomas A. Murray, Christopher Lewandowski, Joseph Farhat, Justin L. Benoit, Michelle H. Biros, Kartik Cherabuddi, Jeffrey G. Chipman, Timothy W. Schacker, Faheem W. Guirgis, Helen T. Voelker, Joseph S. Koopmeiners, Christopher J. Tignanelli, Andrew C Nelson, Alex Hall, David Wright, Ronald A Reilkoff, Tyler Bold, Kenneth Beckman, Ryan Langlois, Matthew T Aliota, James Galbriath, Margaret Beyer, Chas Salmen, Dana Byrne, Brian Roberts. Efficacy of Losartan in Hospitalized Patients With COVID-19–Induced Lung Injury. JAMA Network Open, 2022; 5 (3): e222735 DOI: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.2735

Cite This Page:

University of Minnesota Medical School. "Losartan is not effective in reducing COVID-19 lung injuries, researchers find." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 March 2022. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/03/220316145553.htm>.
University of Minnesota Medical School. (2022, March 16). Losartan is not effective in reducing COVID-19 lung injuries, researchers find. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 17, 2024 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/03/220316145553.htm
University of Minnesota Medical School. "Losartan is not effective in reducing COVID-19 lung injuries, researchers find." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/03/220316145553.htm (accessed July 17, 2024).

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