Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Bird Flu Claims Critically Endangered Mammal

Date:
September 1, 2005
Source:
University of East Anglia
Summary:
A far wider range of wildlife species could be at risk from bird flu warns Dr Diana Bell of the University of East Anglia following her team's discovery that three civet cats have died from bird flu in Vietnam.

A far wider range of wildlife species could be at risk from bird flu, warnsa biologist from the University of East Anglia.

Dr Diana Bell, of UEA's School of Biological Sciences, says the discoverythat avian flu was responsible for the death of three rare civet cats in CucPhuong National Park in Vietnam, raises important questions about the rangeof wildlife species which could now be at risk from this virus.

"Vietnam and the other Asian countries chronically infected with avian fluare biodiversity hotspots rich in species, many only occuring in thisregion," says Dr Bell, whose team has been working with the Vietnamesegovernment, the World Health Organisation and the University of Hong Kong toconfirm the cause of death in the endangered Owston's palm civets.

"The focus so far has been on poultry and human health, and there has beenno screening of mammals in that region. The discovery of avian flu in a newfamily of mammals highlights the possibility that the virus may be capableof infecting other mammal species."

The flu virus is already known to be capable of infecting a number of birdspecies but this raises important questions about the susceptibility ofmammals.

Scott Roberton is technical advisor to the Owston Civet Programme in CucPhuong National Park and a member of the UEA research team working incollaboration with UHK, WHO and the Vietnamese government. He says thesource of the infection has not been identified.

A total of 57 deaths and 112 confirmed cases in humans have been reported tothe WHO, leading to fears of an influenza pandemic. Some 80 per cent ofthese cases have been reported in Vietnam.



Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of East Anglia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of East Anglia. "Bird Flu Claims Critically Endangered Mammal." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 September 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050831074716.htm>.
University of East Anglia. (2005, September 1). Bird Flu Claims Critically Endangered Mammal. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050831074716.htm
University of East Anglia. "Bird Flu Claims Critically Endangered Mammal." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050831074716.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

AP (July 28, 2014) West African nations and international health organizations are working to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. It's one of the deadliest diseases known to man, but the CDC says it's unlikely to spread in the U.S. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Asteroid's Timing Was 'Colossal Bad Luck' For The Dinosaurs

Asteroid's Timing Was 'Colossal Bad Luck' For The Dinosaurs

Newsy (July 28, 2014) The asteroid that killed the dinosaurs struck at the worst time for them. A new study says that if it hit earlier or later, they might've survived. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Sea Turtle Hatchlings Emerge from Nest

Raw: Sea Turtle Hatchlings Emerge from Nest

AP (July 27, 2014) A live-streaming webcam catches loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings emerging from a nest in the Florida Keys. (July 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins