Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Glue Goes Green

Date:
October 16, 2007
Source:
US Department of Agriculture
Summary:
Glue is the latest product to go green. Researchers have developed a new, environmentally friendly adhesive made with renewable natural resources. The glue, which replaces current adhesives that release cancer-causing chemicals into the air, will improve the environment and human health, as well as provide new markets for U.S. soybean farmers. Since the 1940s, adhesive products used to make wood products, such as plywood, particleboard and fiberboard, contained cancer causing-chemicals, such as phenol--formaldehyde and urea--formaldehyde resins.

Glue is the latest product to go green. Researchers at Oregon State University developed a new, environmentally friendly adhesive made with renewable natural resources. The glue, which replaces current adhesives that release cancer-causing chemicals into the air, will improve the environment and human health, as well as provide new markets for U.S. soybean farmers.

Since the 1940s, adhesive products used to make wood products, such as plywood, particleboard and fiberboard, contained cancer causing-chemicals, such as phenol–formaldehyde and urea–formaldehyde resins.

This product, developed by Kaichang Li and colleagues at Oregon State University, provides a high-performance, formaldehyde-free adhesive alternative. The soy-based adhesive is stronger than, and cost-competitive with, conventional adhesives. Application of this adhesive in U.S. wood products may improve the global competitiveness of U.S wood composite companies, including furniture and kitchen cabinetry industries. In addition, the use of a soy-based adhesive product will enhance the economic benefits to U.S. soybean farmers.

In 2006, the new adhesive was adopted by industry and replaced more than 47 million pounds of conventional formaldehyde-based adhesives. A study found the new adhesive reduced the emission of hazardous air pollutants, such as formaldehyde, from each plant by 50 to 90 percent.

Li's inspiration for the adhesive came from the strong, water-resistant proteins used by ocean mussels to cling to rocks to avoid being washed away by the surf. He wanted to develop a wood adhesive from renewable natural resources, like soy protein, carbohydrates and lignin that would be strong and water-resistant.

For this achievement, Li, along with partners Columbia Forest Products and Hercules Incorporated, received the Greener Synthetic Pathways Award, one of five 2007 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge awards, which promote innovative development in, and use of, green chemistry for pollution prevention.

The USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) funded this research project through the National Research Initiative (NRI) Biobased Products and Bioenergy Production Research program. The NRI is the largest peer reviewed, competitive grants program in CSREES. It supports research, education and extension grants that address key problems of national, regional and multi-state importance in sustaining all components of agriculture.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by US Department of Agriculture. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

US Department of Agriculture. "Glue Goes Green." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071014193722.htm>.
US Department of Agriculture. (2007, October 16). Glue Goes Green. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071014193722.htm
US Department of Agriculture. "Glue Goes Green." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071014193722.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

Share This



More Earth & Climate News

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Conservationists Face Uphill PR Battle With New Shark Rules

Conservationists Face Uphill PR Battle With New Shark Rules

Newsy (Sep. 14, 2014) New conservation measures for shark fishing face an uphill PR battle in the fight to slow shark extinction. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pakistan's 'killer Mountain' Fails to Draw Tourists After Attack

Pakistan's 'killer Mountain' Fails to Draw Tourists After Attack

AFP (Sep. 12, 2014) In June 2013, 10 foreign mountaineers and their guide were murdered on Nanga Parbat, an iconic peak that stands at 8,126m tall in northern Pakisan. Duration: 02:34 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Solar Storm To Hit This Weekend, Scientists Not Worried

Solar Storm To Hit This Weekend, Scientists Not Worried

Newsy (Sep. 11, 2014) Two solar flares which erupted in our direction this week will arrive this weekend. The resulting solar storm will be powerful but not dangerous. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Ozone Layer Is Recovering, But It's Not All Good News

The Ozone Layer Is Recovering, But It's Not All Good News

Newsy (Sep. 11, 2014) The Ozone layer is recovering thickness! Hooray! But in helping its recovery, we may have also helped put more greenhouse gases out there. Hooray? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins