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'Sweet wheat' for tastier and more healthful baking

Date:
May 26, 2011
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
"Sweet wheat" has the potential for joining that summertime delight among vegetables -- sweet corn -- as a tasty and healthful part of the diet, the scientific team that developed this mutant form of wheat concludes in a new study.
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"Sweet wheat" has the potential for joining that summertime delight among vegetables -- sweet corn -- as a tasty and healthful part of the diet, the scientific team that developed this mutant form of wheat concludes in a new study. The report appears in the ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Just as sweet corn arose as a mutation in field corn -- being discovered and grown by Native American tribes with the Iroquois introducing European settlers to it in 1779 -- sweet wheat (SW) originated from mutations in field wheat. Toshiki Nakamura, Tomoya Shimbata and colleagues developed SW from two mutant types of wheat that each lack a different enzyme needed to make starch. Because the new wheat has much more sugar than regular wheat, they called it "sweet wheat." To see whether the flour from this new wheat could be used as an ingredient in foods, such as breads and cakes, the researchers analyzed its components.

They found that SW flour tasted sweeter, and SW seeds and flour contained higher levels of sugars, lipids and dietary fiber than seeds and flours of other wheat varieties. "The specific compositional changes that occurred in SW seed suggest that SW flour may provide health benefits when used as a food ingredient," say the researchers, noting its high levels of healthful carbohydrates termed fructans.

The authors acknowledge funding from the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries of Japan.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Tomoya Shimbata, Takayuki Inokuma, Ai Sunohara, Patricia Vrinten, Mika Saito, Toshiyuki Takiya, Toshiki Nakamura. High Levels of Sugars and Fructan in Mature Seed of Sweet Wheat Lacking GBSSI and SSIIa Enzymes. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2011; 59 (9): 4794 DOI: 10.1021/jf200468c

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American Chemical Society. "'Sweet wheat' for tastier and more healthful baking." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110525110444.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2011, May 26). 'Sweet wheat' for tastier and more healthful baking. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110525110444.htm
American Chemical Society. "'Sweet wheat' for tastier and more healthful baking." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110525110444.htm (accessed September 3, 2015).

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