Science News
from research organizations

Cancer Patients Are At High Risk For Potential Drug Interactions

Date:
April 20, 2007
Source:
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Summary:
Potential drug interactions from prescribed medications are common among cancer patients and may cause unnecessary harm, according to a study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
Share:
FULL STORY

Potential drug interactions from prescribed medications are common among cancer patients and may cause unnecessary harm, according to a study in the April 18 Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Cancer patients often take several medications at the same time, not only for treating their cancer but also for side effects and other secondary illnesses. Because of this, they can be at high risk for adverse drug interactions and duplicate medications. Consequences of these interactions can range from inactivation of cancer-fighting medications to severely injuring or killing the patient.

Rachel Riechelmann, M.D., of the Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto, and colleagues gave 405 cancer patients a questionnaire about the medications they had taken in the last four weeks. Their responses were analyzed using a drug interaction software program that could identify potential interactions and rank them by severity.

Nearly a third of patients were exposed to at least one potential drug interaction. The researchers identified 276 drug combinations with the potential to interact. About nine percent of the interactions considered of major severity--risk of death--and 77 percent of moderate severity--risk of serious health problems. About eight percent of the patients received duplicate medications.

The researchers found that some of the drugs interacted with anticancer medications. The most common were warfarin (a drug to prevent blood clots), antihypertension drugs, aspirin and anticonvulsants. Warfarin stood out because it can cause hemorrhages when used with certain chemotherapy medications, and the interaction can interfere with its metabolism. Additionally, patients with brain tumors were at particularly high risk since they are often prescribed anticonvulsants.

"We suggest that patients at high risk... be routinely screened for potential drug interactions. The development of medication databases and computerized physician medication order entry linked to screening electronic programs could help health professionals to identify dangerous drug combinations and monitor prescriptions of agents with high risks of interactions," the authors write.

Article: Riechelmann RP, Tannock IF, Wang L, Saad ED, Taback NA, Krzyzanowska MK. Potential Drug Interactions and Duplicate Prescriptions among Cancer Patients. J Natl Cancer Inst 2007; 99: 592-600


Story Source:

Materials provided by Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Cite This Page:

Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Cancer Patients Are At High Risk For Potential Drug Interactions." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 April 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070417182853.htm>.
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2007, April 20). Cancer Patients Are At High Risk For Potential Drug Interactions. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070417182853.htm
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Cancer Patients Are At High Risk For Potential Drug Interactions." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070417182853.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

RELATED STORIES