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What's The Influence Of Laxative Agents On Mucosal Barrier Repair?

Date:
November 3, 2008
Source:
World Journal of Gastroenterology
Summary:
Lubiprostone has recently been approved for the treatment of chronic constipation and the constipation-predominant form of irritable bowel disease. Intestinal diseases are often accompanied by injury to the mucosal barrier, initiating inflammation and recurring clinical symptoms of intestinal disease.
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Lubiprostone has recently been approved for the treatment of chronic constipation and the constipation-predominant form of irritable bowel disease. Intestinal diseases are often accompanied by injury to the mucosal barrier, initiating inflammation and recurring clinical symptoms of intestinal disease.

A research group in the USA compares lubiprostone (Amitiza) with an alternative treatment for constipation, Polyethylene Glycol 3350 (PEG, Miralax) and reveals that lubiprostone enhances mucosal repair of ischemic-injured porcine ileum whereas PEG 3350 increases permeability.

The prostone lubiprostone has been shown to stimulate chloride secretion via one of the minor intestinal epithelial channels, ClC-2. This results in sustained low-level secretion of water into the lumen. Previous studies by the same research group have identified ClC-2 as a key protein involved in re-assembly of interepithelial tight junctions. Activation of ClC-2 by lubiprostone hastens recovery of barrier function, apparently by recruiting tight junction proteins to the apical-lateral membrane.

Alternate treatments for constipation, such as PEG 3350, generate an osmotic gradient within the lumen that drags electrolytes and fluid into the lumen. Osmotic agents have also been shown to enhance barrier function by alteration of tight junction structure. However, the ability of PEG 3350 to enhance recovery of acutely injured mucosa as compared to lubiprostone has not been previously assessed.

A research article to be published on October 21, 2008 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. The research team led by Dr. Moeser and Blikslager at North Carolina State University in collaboration with investigators at Sucampo Inc. used electrophysiological techniques to study ischemic-injured mucosa ex vivo. Electrical responses were further assessed using mucosal-to-serosal fluxes of radiolabeled paracellular probes and tissues were examined histologically.

Ischemic-injured mucosa treated with either lubiprostone or PEG 3350 showed sharp elevations in short-circuit current, most likely associated with movement of chloride toward the luminal side of the tissue. Chloride secretion has previously been shown to be an important signal for subsequent re-assembly of tight junctions and closure of paracellular spaces within the epithelium. However, only lubiprostone stimulated rapid recovery of barrier function as detected by marked elevations in transepithelial electrical resistance and confirmed by measurement of macromolecular fluxes. Injured tissues had all restituted to the same degree, indicating that changes in barrier function were likely attributable to conformational change of the tight junction and paracellular spaces.

These results demonstrate potential therapeutic properties of the prostones beyond the current indications. Rapid recovery of barrier function has previously been shown to be linked to selective activation of ClC-2, and may lead to novel treatments of intestinal conditions characterized by periodic reductions in barrier function. A greater understanding of the signaling pathways used by prostones to initiate intestinal barrier repair may refine authors' ability to develop targeted treatments for intestinal disease.


Story Source:

Materials provided by World Journal of Gastroenterology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Moeser et al. Comparison of the chloride channel activator lubiprostone and the oral laxative Polyethylene Glycol 3350 on mucosal barrier repair in ischemic-injured porcine intestine. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 2008; 14 (39): 6012 DOI: 10.3748/wjg.14.6012

Cite This Page:

World Journal of Gastroenterology. "What's The Influence Of Laxative Agents On Mucosal Barrier Repair?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 November 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081103102410.htm>.
World Journal of Gastroenterology. (2008, November 3). What's The Influence Of Laxative Agents On Mucosal Barrier Repair?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 21, 2024 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081103102410.htm
World Journal of Gastroenterology. "What's The Influence Of Laxative Agents On Mucosal Barrier Repair?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081103102410.htm (accessed July 21, 2024).

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