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Gold nanoparticles show promise for early detection of heart attacks

Date:
January 15, 2015
Source:
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering
Summary:
A novel colloidal gold test strip is demonstrating great potential for early detection of certain heart attacks. Researchers are developing the strip to test for cardiac troponin I (cTn-I); its level is several thousand times higher in patients experiencing myochardial infarctions. The new strip uses microplasma-generated gold nanoparticles. Compared to AuNPs produced by traditional chemical methods, the surfaces of thesenanoparticles attract more antibodies, which results in significantly higher detection sensitivity.
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Microscopic view of microplasma-gold nanoparticles on a new, highly sensitive, test strip that enables early detection of heart attacks.
Credit: Image courtesy of New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering professors have been collaborating with researchers from Peking University on a new test strip that is demonstrating great potential for the early detection of certain heart attacks.

Kurt H. Becker, a professor in the Department of Applied Physics and the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and WeiDong Zhu, a research associate professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, are helping develop a new colloidal gold test strip for cardiac troponin I (cTn-I) detection. The new strip uses microplasma-generated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and shows much higher detection sensitivity than conventional test strips. The new cTn-I test is based on the specific immune-chemical reactions between antigen and antibody on immunochromatographic test strips using AuNPs.

Compared to AuNPs produced by traditional chemical methods, the surfaces of the gold nanoparticles generated by the microplasma-induced liquid chemical process attract more antibodies, which results in significantly higher detection sensitivity.

cTn-I is a specific marker for myocardial infarction. The cTn-I level in patients experiencing myocardial infarction is several thousand times higher than in healthy people. The early detection of cTn-I is therefore a key factor of heart attack diagnosis and therapy.

The use of microplasmas to generate AuNP is yet another application of the microplasma technology developed by Becker and Zhu. Microplasmas have been used successfully in dental applications (improved bonding, tooth whitening, root canal disinfection), biological decontamination (inactivation of microorganisms and biofilms), and disinfection and preservation of fresh fruits and vegetables.

The microplasma-assisted synthesis of AuNPs has great potential for other biomedical and therapeutic applications such as tumor detection, cancer imaging, drug delivery, and treatment of degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

The routine use of gold nanoparticles in therapy and disease detection in patients is still years away: longer for therapeutic applications and shorter for biosensors. The biggest hurdle to overcome is the fact that the synthesis of monodisperse, size-controlled gold nanoparticles, even using microplasmas, is still a costly, time-consuming, and labor-intensive process, which limits their use currently to small-scale clinical studies, Becker explained.


Story Source:

Materials provided by New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ruixue Wang, Shasha Zuo, Dong Wu, Jue Zhang, Weidong Zhu, Kurt H. Becker, Jing Fang. Microplasma-Assisted Synthesis of Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles and Their Use in the Detection of Cardiac Troponin I (cTn-I). Plasma Processes and Polymers, 2014; DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201400127

Cite This Page:

New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering. "Gold nanoparticles show promise for early detection of heart attacks." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 January 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150115122117.htm>.
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering. (2015, January 15). Gold nanoparticles show promise for early detection of heart attacks. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150115122117.htm
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering. "Gold nanoparticles show promise for early detection of heart attacks." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150115122117.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

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