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Distemper virus affects wild carnivores of all stripes

Date:
February 26, 2015
Source:
Cornell University
Summary:
Tigers, lions and other wild carnivores, already under threat from poaching and habitat loss, are falling victim to Canine distemper, and could soon drive endangered populations to extinction.
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Amur tigers, also known as Siberian tigers, are susceptible to canine distemper virus.
Credit: Image courtesy of Cornell University

Tigers, lions and other wild carnivores, already under threat from poaching and habitat loss, are falling victim to a virus that could soon drive endangered populations to extinction.

Canine distemper virus strikes wild carnivores of all stripes, including Amur tigers, -- also called Siberian tigers -- which roam the Russian Far East in ever-dwindling numbers.

Scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, Cornell and the University of Glasgow are urging swift action to address the crisis by developing control measures for the virus, such as delivering a vaccine that is safe for these animals. They also suggest renaming canine distemper virus to reflect the wide range of animals that can carry the virus and suffer from the disease.

"These small endangered populations of carnivores face a lot of threats, but distemper can be the straw that breaks the camel's back in terms of their survival," said Colin Parrish, a virologist and director of the Cornell Feline Health Center.

Parrish said Amur tigers are under particular threat because they number in the hundreds and many live in sub-populations of fewer than 25 breeding adults. Between 2007 and 2012, canine distemper contributed to the decline of one well-studied population of Amur tigers from 38 to only 9, a reduction the group may not be able to recover from, Parrish said. Similarly, more than 1,000 lions in the Serengeti National Park disappeared in an outbreak of distemper that began in 1993 -- a population decline of about 30 percent.

Studies show that in many cases, wild carnivores are not contracting the distemper virus directly from domestic dogs, but they are getting it from other wild animals that act as intermediaries. This makes controlling the virus exceedingly difficult, Parrish said, and efforts to vaccinate dogs or other wild carnivores may not offer protection for tigers or other large cats.

The situation is urgent, but current distemper vaccines haven't necessarily been thoroughly tested in the wild species that need protection. While many vaccines appear to be safe, some may not be effective in generating long-lived immune defenses, Parrish said. The group discussed ways to test the safety and efficacy of distemper vaccines in captive animals as well as developing innovative means of immunizing wild animals with oral or aerosol formulations planted in bait or on marking posts.

Renaming the canine distemper virus may be in order, Parrish said, in part because the name is not a good reflection of its host range among carnivores; the virus can affect seals, tigers, bears and more. Also, the word "canine" can lead to management efforts that place too much emphasis on controlling the infection in dogs, when other wild animals carry the virus to infect other species.

"Rather than waiting for the possibility of future outbreaks and more extensive population declines to intervene, addressing the issue before it potentially causes irreversible impacts to tiger populations is likely the most important step," said Andrew Allison, a postdoctoral fellow at the Baker Institute for Animal Health in Cornell's College of Veterinary Medicine.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Cornell University. Original written by Merry R. Buckley. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Cite This Page:

Cornell University. "Distemper virus affects wild carnivores of all stripes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 February 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150226131851.htm>.
Cornell University. (2015, February 26). Distemper virus affects wild carnivores of all stripes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150226131851.htm
Cornell University. "Distemper virus affects wild carnivores of all stripes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150226131851.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

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