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High dietary sodium, potassium may worsen chronic kidney disease

Reducing intake may safeguard patients' health

Date:
September 18, 2015
Source:
American Society of Nephrology
Summary:
High dietary intake of sodium and potassium may speed the progression of kidney disease, according to a new study. Researchers found that high urinary excretion levels of both sodium and potassium were linked with faster progression of chronic kidney disease. Additionally, they noted that patients with chronic kidney disease tend to consume sodium above the recommended daily limit. An estimated 26 million people in the United States have chronic kidney disease.
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High dietary intake of sodium and potassium may speed the progression of kidney disease, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). The findings could impact dietary recommendations to help safeguard patients' health.

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health challenge because it is common, frequently progresses to kidney failure, and increases risk of heart disease and premature death. Diet may play an important role in CKD progression, but little is known about the role of certain dietary components such as sodium and potassium.

To investigate, Jiang He, MD, PhD (Tulane University) and his colleagues collected yearly urine samples from 3939 patient with CKD to estimate the patients' dietary sodium and potassium intake. The researchers found that high urinary excretion levels of both sodium and potassium were linked with faster disease progression. In addition, the study's participants consumed an average of 3700 mg of sodium per day, which is much higher than the recommended 2400 mg per day limit.

"These data warrant future clinical trials to test the effect of a moderate reduction in dietary sodium and potassium intake on CKD progression in patients with high dietary sodium or potassium intake," said Dr. He. "The findings could ultimately impact dietary recommendations for patients with CKD to slow disease progression."


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Materials provided by American Society of Nephrology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. J. He, K. T. Mills, L. J. Appel, W. Yang, J. Chen, B. T. Lee, S. E. Rosas, A. Porter, G. Makos, M. R. Weir, L. L. Hamm, J. W. Kusek. Urinary Sodium and Potassium Excretion and CKD Progression. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 2015; DOI: 10.1681/ASN.2015010022

Cite This Page:

American Society of Nephrology. "High dietary sodium, potassium may worsen chronic kidney disease: Reducing intake may safeguard patients' health." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 September 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150918080614.htm>.
American Society of Nephrology. (2015, September 18). High dietary sodium, potassium may worsen chronic kidney disease: Reducing intake may safeguard patients' health. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 24, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150918080614.htm
American Society of Nephrology. "High dietary sodium, potassium may worsen chronic kidney disease: Reducing intake may safeguard patients' health." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150918080614.htm (accessed May 24, 2017).

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