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Ecological context of mosquito-borne infectious disease

Date:
July 8, 2016
Source:
Ecological Society of America
Summary:
The resurgence of Zika virus has raised anxieties about the spread of infectious disease by mosquitoes; climate change and species invasions are strong themes on the minds of infectious disease experts.
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This composite image shows a female (left) and male (right) Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus). Male Ae. albopictus will attempt to mate with females of another mosquito species with overlapping habitat, the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti). Cross species matings may sterilize the Ae. aegypti females for life and contribute to rapid competitive displacements of A. aegypti, as observed in the areas of the southeast United States associated with tiger mosquito invasions.
Credit: J. Newman, Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory, University of Florida.

The resurgence of Zika virus has raised anxieties about the spread of infectious disease by mosquitoes as the Ecological Society of America heads to southern Florida for its 101st Annual Meeting. Research on mosquito biology and disease transmission will have a strong showing at the meeting Fort Lauderdale, this 7-12 August 2016. Climate change and species invasions are strong themes among this year's research presentations on infectious disease.

Geologists have proposed a new epoch, the Anthropocene, to describe our present time, in which the pervasive presence of humans and the products of human invention are shaping the atmosphere, oceans, and ecosystems of the world. The meeting theme "Novel Ecosystems in the Anthropocene" invites a focus on the new relationships between species arising under the influence of global change.

Research presentations:

  • Is mosquito-borne disease risk heating up with a warming climate?
  • Organizing defense forces to hit mosquitoes where they breed
  • Luring mosquitoes into honeysuckle traps
  • Stressed birds get more mosquito bites--and transmit disease
  • An invasive mosquito helps break the spread of a parasite
  • The Asian tiger mosquito thrives in New York
  • Side effects of mosquito defense: broad spectrum insecticides kill the pollinators of rare native flowers
  • Mosquitoes change their temperature preferences when in competition with other mosquito species
  • Life cycles, competition, and management
  • Battle at the bloodmeal lek

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Materials provided by Ecological Society of America. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


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Ecological Society of America. "Ecological context of mosquito-borne infectious disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 July 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160708145130.htm>.
Ecological Society of America. (2016, July 8). Ecological context of mosquito-borne infectious disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 28, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160708145130.htm
Ecological Society of America. "Ecological context of mosquito-borne infectious disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160708145130.htm (accessed May 28, 2017).

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