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Don't panic, but your avocado is radioactive: Study eyes radiation of everyday objects

Date:
October 7, 2016
Source:
North Carolina State University
Summary:
Most people assume all radioactive materials are dangerous, if not deadly. But a new study on the radiation emitted by everyday objects highlights the fact that we interact with radioactive materials every day. The goal of the work is to give people a frame of reference for understanding news stories or other information about radiation and nuclear safety.
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Most people assume all radioactive materials are dangerous, if not deadly. But a new study on the radiation emitted by everyday objects highlights the fact that we interact with radioactive materials every day. The goal of the work is to give people a frame of reference for understanding news stories or other information about radiation and nuclear safety.

"We did this study because understanding how much radiation comes off of common household items helps place radiation readings in context -- it puts things in perspective," says Robert Hayes, an associate professor of nuclear engineering at North Carolina State University. "If people understand what trace levels of radiation mean, that understanding may help prevent panic."

The researchers used a portable gamma radiation meter to measure the external gamma radiation emitted in a North Carolina home. The radiation was measured in microgray per hour (μGy/hr).

Avocados, for example, gave off 0.16 μGy/hr of gamma radiation -- slightly less than the 0.17 μGy/hr emitted by a banana. Bricks gave off 0.15 μGy/hr, while smoke detectors (with their americium components) gave off 0.16. By way of comparison, natural uranium ore measured 1.57 μGy/hr.

"If you're surprised that your fruit is emitting gamma radiation, don't panic," Hayes says. "The regulatory level for workers -- which is safe -- is exposure to 50,000 μGy per year. The levels we're talking about in your household are incredibly low."


Story Source:

Materials provided by North Carolina State University. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Richard D. Milvenan, Robert B. Hayes. Contributions of Various Radiological Sources to Background in a Suburban Environment. Health Physics, 2016; 111: S193 DOI: 10.1097/HP.0000000000000564

Cite This Page:

North Carolina State University. "Don't panic, but your avocado is radioactive: Study eyes radiation of everyday objects." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 October 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161007103545.htm>.
North Carolina State University. (2016, October 7). Don't panic, but your avocado is radioactive: Study eyes radiation of everyday objects. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 27, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161007103545.htm
North Carolina State University. "Don't panic, but your avocado is radioactive: Study eyes radiation of everyday objects." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161007103545.htm (accessed May 27, 2017).

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