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Birth defect predicts testicular cancer, infertility in adulthood

Poor compliance with guidelines on timing of corrective surgery

Date:
August 30, 2018
Source:
University of Sydney
Summary:
New evidence supports international guidelines recommending surgery before 18 months of age for boys with undescended testes to reduce the risk of both testicular cancer and infertility later in life.
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Medical researchers are urging greater compliance with guidelines recommending surgery for undescended testes (UDT) before 18 months of age following new evidence that UDT more than doubles the risk of testicular cancer and increases infertility in adult males.

Led by the University of Sydney researchers and published today in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, this is the first population-based cohort study to assess both adult fertility and cancer risk after surgical correction (orchidopexy) for undescended testes in early childhood. The procedure moves an undescended testicle into the scrotum and permanently fixes it there.

"In addition to an increased risk of testicular cancer, we found that boys with undescended testes had decreased paternity and increased use of assisted reproductive technologies for infertility in later life," said the University of Sydney's Professor Natasha Nassar, the study's senior author.

"The study provides new evidence to support international guidelines recommending surgery before 18 months for boys with undescended testes to reduce the risk of both testicular cancer and infertility later in life."

But compliance with these guidelines remains poor with almost half of all boys with undescended testes in Australia and more than three-quarters worldwide being operated on after 18 months, say the research team from the University of Sydney, Curtin University and the Telethon Kids Institute.

"Before this study, there was no evidence-based information on the impact of early surgery on the future risk of testicular cancer and infertility in adult males," said study leader, Dr Francisco Schneuer of the University of Sydney.

"Early diagnosis, ongoing examination and monitoring by parents and health practitioners and timely referral to surgery of boys with undescended testes is important to ensure adherence with guidelines.

"Early surgery can reduce the risk of malignancy and male infertility, and ultimately has the potential to reduce future adult male reproductive disorders."


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Materials provided by University of Sydney. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Francisco J Schneuer, Elizabeth Milne, Sarra E Jamieson, Gavin Pereira, Michele Hansen, Andrew Barker, Andrew J A Holland, Carol Bower, Natasha Nassar. Association between male genital anomalies and adult male reproductive disorders: a population-based data linkage study spanning more than 40 years. The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, 2018; DOI: 10.1016/S2352-4642(18)30254-2

Cite This Page:

University of Sydney. "Birth defect predicts testicular cancer, infertility in adulthood." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 August 2018. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180829115603.htm>.
University of Sydney. (2018, August 30). Birth defect predicts testicular cancer, infertility in adulthood. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 21, 2024 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180829115603.htm
University of Sydney. "Birth defect predicts testicular cancer, infertility in adulthood." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180829115603.htm (accessed June 21, 2024).

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