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Reference Terms
from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bay mud

Bay mud consists of thick deposits of soft, unconsolidated silty clay, which is saturated with water; these soil layers are situated at the bottom of certain estuaries, which are normally in temperate regions that have experienced cyclical glacial cycles.

Bay muds often have a high organic content, consisting of decayed organisms at lower depths, but may also contain living creatures when they occur at the upper soil layer and become exposed by low tides; then, they are called mudflats, an important ecological zone for shorebirds and many types of marine organisms.

Note:   The above text is excerpted from the Wikipedia article "Bay mud", which has been released under the GNU Free Documentation License.
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October 27, 2016

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updated 12:56 pm ET