Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Moving Wildlife Detrimental To Oral Rabies Vaccination Project

Date:
August 21, 2006
Source:
Virginia Tech
Summary:
On August 8, 2006, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal Plant and Health Inspection Service Wildlife Services will begin releasing approximately 300,000 Oral Rabies Vaccination (ORV) baits from low-flying aircraft and by car in southwestern Virginia as part of a project that spans 14 other states.

On August 8, 2006, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal Plant and Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Wildlife Services (WS), will begin releasing approximately 300,000 Oral Rabies Vaccination (ORV) baits from low-flying aircraft and by car in Buchanan, Dickenson, Lee, Russell, Scott, Smyth, Tazewell, Washington, and Wise counties in southwestern Virginia. The ORV baits vaccinate raccoons against rabies when consumed.

Related Articles


"The ORV program in Virginia is part of a larger project that spans 14 other states," explained Jim Parkhurst, Virginia's wildlife extension specialist based at Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources. He noted, "Raccoon rabies is the most prominent strain of rabies in Virginia." The ORV program is designed to vaccinate raccoons living in the transition zone between areas known to have raccoon rabies and areas that currently do not.

The public health costs associated with rabies detection, prevention, and control in the United States are estimated to be between $300 - $450 million annually.

According to Martin Lowney, State Director of USDA APHIS-WS in Virginia, "Translocation of wildlife (moving animals around) is one of the most detrimental threats to the eradication of rabies." Raccoon rabies arrived in the mid-Atlantic region during the late 1970s when raccoons infected with the disease were translocated from Florida to Shenandoah County, Virginia, and Hardy County, West Virginia. The rabies virus quickly spread up and down the East Coast from these released raccoons.

"Translocation of wildlife continues to be a major threat to the success of the ORV program," reiterated Lowney. Translocation occurs most often by individuals or groups hoping to supplement existing wildlife populations (how the rabies virus initially was brought to Virginia) and by the capture and release of nuisance or rehabilitated wildlife.

In Virginia, regulations currently prohibit the translocation of any wildlife species to an area other than the property where it was caught as a means to protect the health of humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. However, the general public sometimes views translocation of wildlife as a humane solution for trapped problem wildlife. "Relocating wildlife can spread disease by transferring infected animals to unaffected areas, thereby increasing the risk of disease for humans," Parkhurst pointed out. In humans, rabies is almost always a fatal disease.

In addition to the spread of disease, translocation also increases stress on an animal by forcing it to find new food sources, find new shelter, avoid predators, and defend itself while crossing the territories of other animals. "In many instances, translocation leads to the death of the affected animal and promotes the spread of zoonotic diseases," Lowney added.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Virginia Tech. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Virginia Tech. "Moving Wildlife Detrimental To Oral Rabies Vaccination Project." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 August 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060819114905.htm>.
Virginia Tech. (2006, August 21). Moving Wildlife Detrimental To Oral Rabies Vaccination Project. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060819114905.htm
Virginia Tech. "Moving Wildlife Detrimental To Oral Rabies Vaccination Project." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060819114905.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Monarch Butterflies Descend Upon Mexican Forest During Annual Migration

Monarch Butterflies Descend Upon Mexican Forest During Annual Migration

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Dec. 19, 2014) Millions of monarch butterflies begin to descend onto Mexico as part of their annual migration south. Rough Cut (no reporter narration) Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) The new year is coming and nothing will energize you more for 2015 than protein-filled foods. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) gives his favorite high protein foods that will help you build muscle, lose fat and have endless energy. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Birds Might Be Better Meteorologists Than Us

Birds Might Be Better Meteorologists Than Us

Newsy (Dec. 19, 2014) A new study suggests a certain type of bird was able to sense a tornado outbreak that moved through the U.S. a day before it hit. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins