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New way to form extracellular vesicles

Date:
November 21, 2011
Source:
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine
Summary:
Researchers have discovered a protein called TAT-5 that affects the production of extracellular vesicles, small sacs of membrane released from the surface of cells, capable of sending signals to other cells.

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have discovered a protein called TAT-5 that affects the production of extracellular vesicles, small sacs of membrane released from the surface of cells, capable of sending signals to other cells. When released extracellular vesicles can affect tumor spread, blood clotting and inflammation. Their discovery gives new insight into how extracellular vesicles form, and reveals new potential strategies to manipulate diseases such as cancer.

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The study was published online November 17, 2011 in Current Biology.

"Very little is known about how cells release extracellular vesicles from their surfaces, so the discovery of TAT-5 opens the door to learning how to manipulate their numbers and thus affect cell communication," said Jeremy Nance, PhD, associate professor of Cell Biology at NYU School of Medicine and a member of the Developmental Genetics Program at the Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine.

Researchers at NYU Langone studied the embryo of the worm C. elegans and discovered that TAT-5 inhibits the budding of extracellular vesicles from the surface of cells. Several types of tumors produce extracellular vesicles that can induce tumor cell invasion or metastasis. Researchers found they can use tat-5 mutants as a tool to study how extracellular vesicles are formed, enabling the design of strategies to regulate their formation. In the study, researchers also discovered that two proteins that regulate viral budding are involved in extracellular vesicle release, suggesting that budding of viruses and release of extracellular vesicles might occur through similar mechanisms, and that this research may reveal new strategies to inhibit viral spread.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ann M. Wehman, Corey Poggioli, Peter Schweinsberg, Barth D. Grant, Jeremy Nance. The P4-ATPase TAT-5 Inhibits the Budding of Extracellular Vesicles in C. elegans Embryos. Current Biology, 17 November 2011 DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2011.10.040

Cite This Page:

NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine. "New way to form extracellular vesicles." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 November 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111117141249.htm>.
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine. (2011, November 21). New way to form extracellular vesicles. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111117141249.htm
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine. "New way to form extracellular vesicles." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111117141249.htm (accessed December 20, 2014).

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