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Nemo on chemo: Pig receiving chemotherapy for lymphoma successfully recovering

Date:
July 24, 2013
Source:
Cornell University
Summary:
Playful as a puppy even at 730 pounds, Nemo, a rescued black-and-white Hampshire pig, became a porcine pioneer after lymphoma struck. Undergoing a novel care plan, he became a teaching case for veterinary oncologists at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals, paving the way to combat cancer in large animals. Nemo is believed to be the first pig to be treated for lymphoma. The pig's medical treatment began when his owner, George Goldner, saw his friend fall ill.

Playful as a puppy even at 730 pounds, Nemo, a rescued black-and-white Hampshire pig, became a porcine pioneer after lymphoma struck.

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Undergoing a novel care plan, he became a teaching case for veterinary oncologists at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals, paving the way to combat cancer in large animals. Nemo is believed to be the first pig to be treated for lymphoma. The pig's medical treatment began when his owner, George Goldner, saw his friend fall ill.

"I want to do everything humanly possible for my animals," said Goldner. When the 4-year-old had a coughing fit and laid down in the snow, Goldner drove Nemo nearly four hours to Cornell's hospital, where the pig was diagnosed with presumptive B-cell lymphoma, a blood cancer.

Cornell hospital clinicians worked to prepare for intravenous medication delivery. In the first such procedure ever done to treat a sick pig, surgeon Jim Flanders, who had performed similar procedures in smaller animals, joined large-animal surgeon Susan Fubini to surgically implant a vascular access port.

They ran a catheter up a vein in Nemo's neck to a port behind his ear, creating a route for delivering drugs where they would be most effective while minimizing harm. Resident Emily Barrell selected and delivered the chemotherapeutic drugs.

"Although lymphoma has been documented in swine, there aren't any documented cases of pigs being treated for it," said Cornell hospital oncologist Cheryl Balkman. "We adapted a treatment plan based on what we know is effective in dogs, cats and humans with lymphoma."

Nemo's clinical signs soon resolved, and he has continued to do well during long-term treatment. Though little is known about the prognosis for pigs with cancer, Nemo has the notable distinction of establishing a precedent, giving veterinarians valuable information for helping large animals. Since arriving in March, Nemo has resided at Cornell's hospital for animals.

"He has a better life there," said Goldner. "He's running around digging holes, eating pineapples, communicating vocally and getting lots of love. Cornell Hospital for Animals people play with him and bring him treats, and he plays funny tricks like tossing water at the residents. The vets have cared for him with amazing dedication and thoughtfulness, especially Dr. Barrell. It's been a wonderful effort on the part of several people: a testament to the outstanding work done at Cornell."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cornell University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Cornell University. "Nemo on chemo: Pig receiving chemotherapy for lymphoma successfully recovering." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 July 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130724200120.htm>.
Cornell University. (2013, July 24). Nemo on chemo: Pig receiving chemotherapy for lymphoma successfully recovering. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130724200120.htm
Cornell University. "Nemo on chemo: Pig receiving chemotherapy for lymphoma successfully recovering." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130724200120.htm (accessed October 26, 2014).

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