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Like father, not like son: Brain and song structure in zebra finches are strongly influenced by the environment

Date:
October 2, 2013
Source:
Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
Summary:
A central topic in behavioral biology is the question, which aspects of a behavior are learned or expressed due to genetic predisposition. Today it is known that our personality and behavior are far less determined by the genetic background. Especially during development environmental factors can shape brain and behavior via so-called epigenetic effects. Thereby hormones play an important role. netic predisposition. However, it is relatively hard to discriminate the effects of the environment from that of the genes.

Zebra finch pair with adult son.
Credit: Stefan Leitner

A central topic in behavioral biology is the question, which aspects of a behavior are learned or expressed due to genetic predisposition. Today it is known that our personality and behavior are far less determined by the genetic background. Especially during development environmental factors can shape brain and behavior via so-called epigenetic effects. Thereby hormones play an important role. A shift in hormone concentrations in early life can have long lasting effects for an organism, whereas the same change in adults often may show only short-term changes. However, whether the influence of the environment has either strong or weak effects can largely depend on the individual genetic predisposition. However, it is relatively hard to discriminate the effects of the environment from that of the genes.

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An attempt to tease apart these effects has been conducted by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in collaboration with an international team of scientists in zebra finch breeding pairs. Using partial cross-fostering the researchers exchanged half of the eggs within a nest making them to “cuckoo’s eggs”. Therefore half of the hatchlings were raised by their genetic parents, whereas the other half was raised by their foster parents. In addition they modified the availability of food by mixing the seeds with husks so that the parents had to spend more time searching for food. When the male offspring were adult at 100 days the researchers recorded their songs and analyzed the underlying neuroanatomy. This partial cross-fostering design enabled the researchers to tease apart the involvement of genotype, the rearing environment and nutritional effects to variation in song behavior and brain structure.

The results showed that heritability values were low for most song characteristics, except the number of song syllables and maximum frequency. On the other hand the common rearing environment including the song of the foster father mainly predicted the proportion of unique syllables in the songs of the sons, moreover this relationship was dependent on food availability. Even more striking results were found when the researchers investigated the brain anatomy. Heritability of brain variables was very low and strongly controlled by the environment. For example, an emergence of a clear relationship between brain mass and genotype is prevented by varying environmental quality.

This result was quite surprising as previous studies have found a high heritability of the song control system in the songbird brain, however these studies did not account for variation of the rearing environment. ”Being highly flexible in response to environmental conditions can maintain genetic variation and influences song learning and brain development” says Stefan Leitner, senior author of the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Max Planck Institute for Ornithology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Joseph L. Woodgate, Katherine L. Buchanan, Andrew T.D. Bennett, Clive K. Catchpole, Roswitha Brighton, Stefan Leitner. ENVIRONMENTAL AND GENETIC CONTROL OF BRAIN AND SONG STRUCTURE IN THE ZEBRA FINCH. Evolution, 2013; DOI: 10.1111/evo.12261

Cite This Page:

Max Planck Institute for Ornithology. "Like father, not like son: Brain and song structure in zebra finches are strongly influenced by the environment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131002092145.htm>.
Max Planck Institute for Ornithology. (2013, October 2). Like father, not like son: Brain and song structure in zebra finches are strongly influenced by the environment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131002092145.htm
Max Planck Institute for Ornithology. "Like father, not like son: Brain and song structure in zebra finches are strongly influenced by the environment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131002092145.htm (accessed March 27, 2015).

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