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Less but more frequent exercise best to reduce weight? Study provides a clue

Date:
October 30, 2017
Source:
Stony Brook University
Summary:
Low magnitude, high frequency mechanical stimulation (LMMS) reduces adipose (fat) tissue and thus may be a method of reducing weight and health risks such as diabetes. A new study takes this concept to another level.
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Studies have shown that low magnitude, high frequency mechanical stimulation (LMMS) delivered via low intensity vibration reduces adipose (fat) tissue and thus may be a method of reducing weight and health risks related to weight gain such as diabetes. A recent study in the journal Obesity, led by Vhitaben Patel, a PhD student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Stony Brook University, takes this concept to another level. Patel and colleagues found in a model of obese mice that low intensity vibration is more effective in reducing weight and glucose metabolism when separated throughout the day instead of all at once.

The authors maintain that while exercise remains important to minimize obesity and reduce risk of diabetes and other diseases, low intensity vibration can serve as a surrogate to exercise. The findings, they say, provide a new insight for reducing weight and minimizing health risks in that shorter bouts of exercise or low intensity vibrations separated by a rest period appear to be more effective than one long bout."


Story Source:

Materials provided by Stony Brook University. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Vihitaben S. Patel, M. Ete Chan, Gabriel M. Pagnotti, Danielle M. Frechette, Janet Rubin, Clinton T. Rubin. Incorporating Refractory Period in Mechanical Stimulation Mitigates Obesity-Induced Adipose Tissue Dysfunction in Adult Mice. Obesity, 2017; 25 (10): 1745 DOI: 10.1002/oby.21958

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Stony Brook University. "Less but more frequent exercise best to reduce weight? Study provides a clue." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 October 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171030154554.htm>.
Stony Brook University. (2017, October 30). Less but more frequent exercise best to reduce weight? Study provides a clue. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 25, 2024 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171030154554.htm
Stony Brook University. "Less but more frequent exercise best to reduce weight? Study provides a clue." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171030154554.htm (accessed April 25, 2024).

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