Science News
from research organizations

Heart: Electronic stent to provide feedback and therapy, then dissolve

Date:
May 27, 2015
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Every year, an estimated half-million Americans undergo surgery to have a stent prop open a coronary artery narrowed by plaque. But sometimes the mesh tubes get clogged. Scientists have now developed a new kind of multi-tasking stent that could minimize the risks associated with the procedure. It can sense blood flow and temperature, store and transmit the information for analysis and can be absorbed by the body after it finishes its job.
Share:
FULL STORY

A multi-tasking stent can measure blood flow, take temperature readings, release drugs and dissolve when it’s no longer needed.
Credit: Kim lab image, adapted from ACS version

Every year, an estimated half-million Americans undergo surgery to have a stent prop open a coronary artery narrowed by plaque. But sometimes the mesh tubes get clogged. Scientists report in the journal ACS Nano a new kind of multi-tasking stent that could minimize the risks associated with the procedure. It can sense blood flow and temperature, store and transmit the information for analysis and can be absorbed by the body after it finishes its job.

Doctors have been implanting stents to unblock coronary arteries for 30 years. During that time, the devices have evolved from bare metal, mesh tubes to coated stents that can release drugs to prevent reclogging. But even these are associated with health risks. So researchers have been working on versions that the body can absorb to minimize the risk that a blood clot will form. And now Dae-Hyeong Kim, Seung Hong Choi, Taeghwan Hyeon and colleagues are taking that idea a step further.

The researchers developed and tested in animals a drug-releasing electronic stent that can provide diagnostic feedback by measuring blood flow, which slows when an artery starts narrowing. The device can also heat up on command to speed up drug delivery, and it can dissolve once it's no longer needed.


Story Source:

Materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Donghee Son, Jongha Lee, Dong Jun Lee, Roozbeh Ghaffari, Sumin Yun, Seok Joo Kim, Ji Eun Lee, Hye Rim Cho, Soonho Yoon, Shixuan Yang, Seunghyun Lee, Shutao Qiao, Daishun Ling, Sanghun Shin, Jun-Kyul Song, Jaemin Kim, Taeho Kim, Hakyong Lee, Jonghoon Kim, Min Soh, Nohyun Lee, Cheol Seong Hwang, Sangwook Nam, Nanshu Lu, Taeghwan Hyeon, Seung Hong Choi, Dae-Hyeong Kim. Bioresorbable Electronic Stent Integrated with Therapeutic Nanoparticles for Endovascular Diseases. ACS Nano, 2015; 150428162907007 DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.5b00651

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Heart: Electronic stent to provide feedback and therapy, then dissolve." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 May 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/05/150527113004.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2015, May 27). Heart: Electronic stent to provide feedback and therapy, then dissolve. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 29, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/05/150527113004.htm
American Chemical Society. "Heart: Electronic stent to provide feedback and therapy, then dissolve." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/05/150527113004.htm (accessed May 29, 2017).

RELATED STORIES