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New moms are concerned about beginning breastfeeding, survey shows

Date:
August 4, 2015
Source:
Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN)
Summary:
Beginning breastfeeding is the second-greatest concern of pregnant moms, ranked just after proper recovery from labor and birth, said more than 1,000 survey participants.
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Beginning breastfeeding is the second-greatest concern of pregnant moms, ranked just after proper recovery from labor and birth, said more than 1,000 survey participants of Healthy Mom&Baby, a consumer magazine (print and online) from the mother/baby nurses of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric & Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN).

Most expectant moms want to breastfeed their newborns yet most say they don't know how to prepare. When asked by Healthy Mom&Baby, moms said they plan to:

·Begin breastfeeding: 78% plan to breastfeed post-birth with the rest "unsure"

·Get a breast pump and supplies to support breastfeeding: 76% plan to obtain a breast pump either through their insurer or through purchase, as well as nursing supplies, including breastmilk bottle and storage systems, warmers, and breastfeeding tops, dresses and wraps

Healthy Mom&Baby has just released "Breastfeeding Basics: You, Your Baby & Your Nurses." Designed for pregnant women, this new nursing resource shows how breastfeeding is natural. Moms and babies need patience, practice and the support of their nurses while they get the hang of it.

In "Prepare for Breastfeeding" and "Begin Breastfeeding," Healthy Mom&Baby nurse advisor Charlotte Wool, PhD, RN, stresses the importance of breastfeeding: "It's worth the effort because your breastmilk is perfect food your body makes specifically for your baby's nutritional needs and optimal growth." Dr. Wool shares practical tips and advice from nurses to show moms what's ahead, how to avoid common problems and how to nurse or provide breastmilk even if your baby is born prematurely.

"Research shows that moms and their infants are most likely to succeed with breastfeeding when they have the support of their healthcare providers, nurses and families," said AWHONN Chief Executive Officer Lynn Erdman, MN, RN, FAAN. "Women should be encouraged and supported to breastfeed exclusively for the first six months of an infant's life and to continue to breastfeed for the first year and beyond."

"Similar to that of AWHONN, our mission at Philips Avent is to support parents during this special time and help their newborns receive a healthy, happy start in life," said Boon Lai, Vice President of Marketing for Philips North America. "Through this educational grant with AWHONN and our donation of breast pumps, we're excited to provide new parents with the resources they need to take on one of the most important milestones with their babies."

For more information, see http://www.health4mom.org/breastfeeding-basics-you-your-baby-your-nurses


Story Source:

Materials provided by Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Cite This Page:

Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN). "New moms are concerned about beginning breastfeeding, survey shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 August 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/08/150804203438.htm>.
Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN). (2015, August 4). New moms are concerned about beginning breastfeeding, survey shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 8, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/08/150804203438.htm
Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN). "New moms are concerned about beginning breastfeeding, survey shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/08/150804203438.htm (accessed May 8, 2017).