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Concussions and brain injury: Can omega-3 intake aid in brain health recovery?

Date:
August 24, 2016
Source:
Taylor & Francis
Summary:
The treatment of concussions and traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a clinical challenge. Clinical studies thus far have failed to identify an effective treatment strategy when a combination of targets controlling aspects of neuroprotection, neuroinflammation, and neuroregeneration is needed. According to emerging science and clinical experience, aggressive intake of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3FA) seems to be beneficial to TBI, concussion, and post-concussion syndrome patients.
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The treatment of concussions and traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a clinical challenge. Clinical studies thus far have failed to identify an effective treatment strategy when a combination of targets controlling aspects of neuroprotection, neuroinflammation, and neuroregeneration is needed. According to emerging science and clinical experience, aggressive intake of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3FA) seems to be beneficial to TBI, concussion, and post-concussion syndrome patients. This research is presented in Concussions, Traumatic Brain Injury, and the Innovative Use of Omega-3s, a review article from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, official publication of the American College of Nutrition.

Research suggests that early and optimal doses of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3FA) have the potential to improve outcomes from traumatic brain injury. The article reviews preclinical research and cites three brain injury case studies that resulted from a mining accident, a motor vehicle accident, and a drowning accident. Each instance showcased evidence of safety and tolerability, wherein the patients who sustained life-threatening brain injuries recovered brain health with the aid of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3FA).

Growing clinical experience by numerous providers is that the brain needs to be saturated with high doses of n-3FA in order for the brain to have the opportunity to heal. Without an optimal supply of omegas, healing is less likely to happen. It is well recognized that n-3FAs are not a drug and not a cure and every situation is different. Clinically, some patients respond better than others. However, there is no downside to providing optimal levels of nutrition in order to give a patient the best opportunity to regain as much function as possible following a TBI.


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Materials provided by Taylor & Francis. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Michael D. Lewis. Concussions, Traumatic Brain Injury, and the Innovative Use of Omega-3s. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 2016; 35 (5): 469 DOI: 10.1080/07315724.2016.1150796

Cite This Page:

Taylor & Francis. "Concussions and brain injury: Can omega-3 intake aid in brain health recovery?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 August 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/08/160824140113.htm>.
Taylor & Francis. (2016, August 24). Concussions and brain injury: Can omega-3 intake aid in brain health recovery?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 22, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/08/160824140113.htm
Taylor & Francis. "Concussions and brain injury: Can omega-3 intake aid in brain health recovery?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/08/160824140113.htm (accessed May 22, 2017).

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