Science News
from research organizations

Mouse cell line developed to fast-track research in BRAF melanoma

Date:
January 6, 2015
Source:
Norris Cotton Cancer Center Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center
Summary:
By developing cell lines that grow readily in culture, investigators have created a fast-track research tool that remains applicable to many scientists who use mouse melanoma as a model system.
Share:
FULL STORY

Melanoma in humans is on the rise, with one in 50 individuals likely to have the disease. By developing cell lines that grow readily in culture, Dartmouth investigators led by Constance Brinckerhoff, PhD have created a fast-track research tool that remains applicable to many scientists who use mouse melanoma as a model system. The findings were first published in May 2014 in Pigment Cell Melanoma Research.

"The ability to study these mouse melanoma cell lines both in culture and in mice with an intact immune system is an experimental advantage," explained Brinckerhoff.

The team developed a protocol that allows mouse BRAF melanoma cells to grow readily in culture and to be transplanted in syngeneic mice. The cell lines are genetically compatible with a strain of mice that are immunologically competent, while human cells need to be placed into immunologically weakened mice in order to grow.

Since publication, there have been worldwide requests for the cell lines and Brinckerhoff's team is developing additional characterization of the cells. Brinckerhoff reports, "More than 20 labs have contacted us since the paper was published and the feedback we've received indicates investigators worldwide are seeing experimental advantages in using the new cell lines. For years, the lack of mouse cell lines that harbor the BRAF mutation has been a barrier to rapidly moving research forward."


Story Source:

Materials provided by Norris Cotton Cancer Center Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Molly H. Jenkins, Shannon M. Steinberg, Matthew P. Alexander, Jan L. Fisher, Marc S. Ernstoff, Mary Jo Turk, David W. Mullins, Constance E. Brinckerhoff. Multiple murine BRafV600Emelanoma cell lines with sensitivity to PLX4032. Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research, 2014; 27 (3): 495 DOI: 10.1111/pcmr.12220

Cite This Page:

Norris Cotton Cancer Center Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. "Mouse cell line developed to fast-track research in BRAF melanoma." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 January 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150106154710.htm>.
Norris Cotton Cancer Center Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. (2015, January 6). Mouse cell line developed to fast-track research in BRAF melanoma. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150106154710.htm
Norris Cotton Cancer Center Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. "Mouse cell line developed to fast-track research in BRAF melanoma." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150106154710.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

RELATED STORIES