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Today's Healthcare News
February 28, 2017

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updated 7:29am EST

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February 28, 2017

Doctors Should Discuss Herbal Medication Use With Heart Disease Patients

Feb. 27, 2017 — Physicians should be well-versed in the herbal medications heart disease patients may take to be able to effectively discuss their clinical implications, potential benefits and side effects—despite ... read more

Alzheimer's Drug Prescribed Off-Label Could Pose Risk for Some

Feb. 25, 2017 — Donepezil, a medication that is approved to treat people with Alzheimer's disease, should not be prescribed for people with mild cognitive impairment without a genetic test. Researchers ... read more

Antibiotics Used to Treat Cystic Fibrosis Increases Risk of Permanent Hearing Loss

Feb. 25, 2017 — A powerful class of antibiotics provides life-saving relief for people with cystic fibrosis; however, a new study for the first time reveals the levels at which high cumulative dosages over time ... read more

Antibiotic Resistance: A Burgeoning Problem for Kids Too

Feb. 24, 2017 — In a new, first-of-its-kind study, researchers have found a 700-percent surge in infections caused by bacteria from the Enterobacteriaceae family resistant to multiple kinds of antibiotics among ... read more

Multidrug Resistant Bacteria Found in Hospital Sinks

Feb. 24, 2017 — Many recent reports have found multidrug resistant bacteria living in hospital sink drainpipes, putting them in close proximity to vulnerable patients. But how the bacteria find their way out of the ... read more

New Nano Approach Could Cut Dose of Leading HIV Treatment in Half

Feb. 24, 2017 — Successful results have utilized nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV ... read more

Controversial Test Could Be Leading to Unnecessary Open Heart Operations

Feb. 24, 2017 — An approved international test to check whether people need open heart surgery could be sending twice as many people under the knife unnecessarily, at a cost of nearly £75m, research has ... read more

Feb. 23, 2017 — A small study in 16 people suggests that deep brain stimulation is safe and might help improve mood, anxiety and well-being, while increasing ... read more

Young Doctors Working in Infectious Diseases Suffering Burnout and Bullying

Feb. 23, 2017 — One in five physicians working in medical microbiology and infectious diseases is suffering from burnout, bullying and poor work-life ... read more

Using Twitter May Increase Food-Poisoning Reporting

Feb. 23, 2017 — Nearly 1 in 4 U.S. citizens gets food poisoning every year, but very few report it. Twitter communications between the public and the proper government authorities could improve foodborne illness ... read more

Sugar's 'Tipping Point' Link to Alzheimer's Disease Revealed

Feb. 23, 2017 — For the first time a molecular 'tipping point' has been demonstrated in Alzheimer's, linking high blood sugar with this debilitating ... read more

Receiving a Clot-Buster Drug Before Reaching the Hospital May Reduce Stroke Disability

Feb. 23, 2017 — A preliminary study shows that giving a clot-busting drug in a mobile stroke unit ambulance may lead to less disability after stroke, compared to when the clot-buster is given after reaching the ... read more

Patients Registered in a Heart Failure Registry Lived Longer

Feb. 23, 2017 — Heart failure patients registered in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry receive better medication and have a 35 percent lower risk of death than unregistered patients, according to a new ... read more

Direct-to-Consumer Genomics: Harmful or Empowering?

Feb. 23, 2017 — In a new study, a research explores questions that stem from new advances in direct-to-consumer DNA tests, which have the effect of separating the physician-patient relationship from access to new ... read more

Many Stroke Patients Do Not Receive Life-Saving Therapy

Feb. 23, 2017 — Many ischemic stroke patients do not get tPA, which can decrease their chances for recovery. Blacks, Hispanics, women and 'Stroke Belters' are less likely to get tPA. Patients treated in ... read more

Study Finds Resistant Infections Rising, With Longer Hospital Stays for US Children

Feb. 23, 2017 — Infections caused by a type of bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics are occurring more frequently in US children and are associated with longer hospital stays and a trend towards greater risk ... read more

Is Back Pain Killing Us?

Feb. 23, 2017 — Older people who suffer from back pain have a 13 per cent increased risk of dying from any cause, research has found. The study of 4390 Danish twins aged more than 70 years investigated whether ... read more

Study Reveals Proven Ways to Improve Doctor-Patient Communication

Feb. 23, 2017 — A hospital-wide communication training program, outlining best practices for doctors to follow in interactions with patients, improved patients' perception of doctor communication by 9 percent, ... read more

A Prescription With Legs

Feb. 23, 2017 — Physician-delivered step count prescriptions, combined with the use of a pedometer, can lead to a 20 per cent increase in daily steps, as well as measurable health benefits, such as lower blood sugar ... read more

Gastric Balloon Is New Weight Loss Option

Feb. 23, 2017 — The Food and Drug Administration has approved another option to treat obesity: a grapefruit-size gastric balloon that takes up as much as half the volume of the ... read more

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